Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
 

Wisdom Teeth Extraction

Wisdom Teeth Extraction

What are wisdom teeth?

Also called third molars, wisdom teeth usually make their first appearance in young adults between the ages of 15 to 25. Because most mouths are too small for these four additional molars, an extraction (removal) procedure, sometimes immediately after they surface, is often necessary.

When should wisdom teeth be removed?

The following symptoms may indicate that the wisdom teeth have erupted and surfaced, and should be removed before they cause more serious problems. The wisdom teeth may be partially erupted--meaning, the teeth have partially surfaced and have no room in the mouth to come in completely. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:

Completely impacted teeth have not come through the gum and may never erupt into the mouth. If they are not causing problems or potential problems, then many dentists will opt to monitor them over time. If the wisdom teeth are causing  problems or likely to cause problems, most oral health specialists will recommend an immediate removal of the wisdom teeth. Early removal will help to eliminate problems, such as an impacted tooth that causes the roots of the second molar to dissolve. According to the American Academy of General Dentistry, third molar impaction is the most prevalent medical developmental disorder.

What problems are often associated with impacted third molars?

What is involved in the extraction procedure?

Wisdom tooth extraction surgery involves making an incision through the gum tissue that presides over the tooth, gently detaching the connective tissue between the tooth and the bone, removing the tooth, and suturing (sewing) the opening in the gum.

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