Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
 

Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding your child:

Nature designed human milk especially for human babies, and it has several advantages over any substitute ever developed. Your milk contains just the right balance of nutrients, and it contains them in a form most easily used by the human baby's immature body systems. Because it was developed for your human baby, your milk also is gentlest on your baby's systems.

Getting started with breastfeeding:

The process of breastfeeding and your milk change as your baby grows and develops. A newborn's feeding routine may be different than that of a breastfeeding six-month-old. As the baby grows, the nutrients in your milk adapt to your growing baby's needs. The anti-infective properties also increase if you or your baby is exposed to some new bacteria or virus.

Your baby should:

Your baby probably will go through several two to four day "growth spurt" periods when he/she seems to want to eat almost around the clock. Babies commonly experience a growth spurt between two to three weeks, four to six weeks, and again at about three months. It is important to let a baby feed more often during these spurts. Within a few days, your baby will have returned to a more typical pattern.

Let your baby set the pace for breastfeeding. Pay attention to his/her feeding cues. The number of feedings each baby needs and the length of time each feeding lasts will vary from baby to baby. Trying to force a breastfed baby to wait longer between feedings, or fit a particular feeding schedule, can result in poor weight gain.

Click here to view the
Online Resources of Pediatrics

 

Top of Page return to top of page