Medial Epicondylitis

Medial Epicondylitis (Golfer's or Baseball Elbow)

What is medial epicondylitis?

Medial epicondylitis, also known as golfer's elbow, baseball elbow, suitcase elbow, or forehand tennis elbow, is characterized by pain from the elbow to the wrist on the inside (medial side) of the elbow. The pain is caused by damage to the tendons that bend the wrist toward the palm. A tendon is a tough cord of tissue that connects muscles to bones.

What causes medial epicondylitis?

Medial epicondylitis is caused by the excessive force used to bend the wrist toward the palm, such as swinging a golf club or pitching a baseball. Other possible causes of medial epicondylitis include the following:

What are the symptoms of medial epicondylitis?

The following are the most common symptoms of medial epicondylitis. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently.

The most common symptom of medial epicondylitis is pain along the palm side of the forearm, from the elbow to the wrist, on the same side as the little finger. The pain can be felt when bending the wrist toward the palm against resistance, or when squeezing a rubber ball.

The symptoms of medial epicondylitis may resemble other medical problems or conditions. Always consult your physician for a diagnosis.

How is medial epicondylitis diagnosed?

The diagnosis of medial epicondylitis usually can be made based on a physical examination. The physician may rest the arm on a table, palm side up, and ask the patient to raise the hand by bending the wrist against resistance. If a person has medial epicondylitis, pain usually is felt in the inner aspect of the elbow.

Treatment for medial epicondylitis:

Specific treatment for medial epicondylitis will be determined by your physician based on:

Treatment for medial epicondylitis includes stopping the activity that produces the symptoms. Treatment may include:

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