Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
 

Skin Cancer

Conditions A-Z - Skin Cancer

What is skin cancer?

Skin cancer is a malignant tumor that grows in the skin cells. In the US alone, more than 2 million Americans were expected to be diagnosed in 2010 with nonmelanoma skin cancer, and 68,130 were expected to be diagnosed with melanoma, according to the American Cancer Society.

Picture of a woman tanning on the beach, wearing a wide-brimmed hat

What are the different types of skin cancer?

There are three main types of skin cancer, including:

NameDescription
Basal cell carcinoma Basal cell carcinoma accounts for approximately 80 percent of all skin cancers. This highly treatable cancer starts in the basal cell layer of the epidermis (the top layer of skin) and grows very slowly. Basal cell carcinoma usually appears as a small, shiny bump or nodule on the skin - mainly those areas exposed to the sun, such as the head, neck, arms, hands, and face. It commonly occurs among persons with light-colored eyes, hair, and complexion.
Squamous cell carcinoma Squamous cell carcinoma, although more aggressive than basal cell carcinoma, is highly treatable. It accounts for about 20 percent of all skin cancers. Squamous cell carcinoma may appear as nodules or red, scaly patches of skin, and may be found on sun-exposed areas, such as the face, ears, lips, and mouth. However, if left untreated, squamous cell carcinoma can spread to other parts of the body. This type of skin cancer is usually found in fair-skinned people.
Malignant melanoma Malignant melanoma accounts for a small percentage of all skin cancers, but accounts for most deaths from skin cancer. Malignant melanoma starts in the melanocytes - cells that produce pigment in the skin. Malignant melanomas sometimes begin as an abnormal mole that then turns cancerous. This cancer may spread quickly. Malignant melanoma most often appears on fair-skinned men and women, but persons with all skin types may be affected.

Distinguishing benign moles from melanoma:

To prevent melanoma, it is important to examine your skin on a regular basis, and become familiar with moles, and other skin conditions, in order to better identify changes. Certain moles are at higher risk for changing into malignant melanoma. Moles that are present at birth (congenital nevi), and atypical moles (dyplastic nevi), have a greater chance of becoming malignant. Recognizing changes in moles, by following this ABCD Chart, is crucial in detecting malignant melanoma at its earliest stage. The warning signs are:

Normal Mole / MelanomaSign Characteristic
Photo comparing normal and melanoma moles showing asymmetry Asymmetry when half of the mole does not match the other half
Photo comparing normal and melanoma moles showing border irregularity Border when the border (edges) of the mole are ragged or irregular
Photo comparing normal and melanoma moles showing color Color when the color of the mole varies throughout
Photo comparing normal and melanoma moles showing diameter Diameter if the mole's diameter is larger than a pencil's eraser
Photographs Used By Permission: National Cancer Institute

Melanomas vary greatly in appearance. Some melanomas may show all of the ABCD characteristics, while others may only show changes in fewer, or none, of these characteristics. Always consult your physician for a diagnosis.

What is a risk factor?

A risk factor is anything that may increase a person's chance of developing a disease. It may be an activity, such as smoking, diet, family history, or many other things. Different diseases, including cancers, have different risk factors.

Although these factors can increase a person's risk, they do not necessarily cause the disease. Some people with one or more risk factors never develop the disease, while others develop disease and have no known risk factors.

But, knowing your risk factors to any disease can help to guide you into the appropriate actions, including changing behaviors and being clinically monitored for the disease.

What are the risk factors for melanoma?

Skin cancer is more common in fair-skinned people - especially those with blond or red hair, who have light-colored eyes. Skin cancer is rare in children. However, no one is safe from skin cancer. Other risk factors include:

Prevention of skin cancer:

The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) recommends the following steps to help reduce your risk of skin cancer: 

Wear protective clothing, including a long-sleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses, when possible.

Seek the shade when appropriate, especially when the sun's rays are the strongest, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Regularly use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF (sun protection factor) of 30 or higher on all exposed skin, even on cloudy days. Sunscreen should be reapplied every 2 hours and after swimming or sweating.

Protect children from the sun by using shade, protective clothing, and applying sunscreen.

Use extra caution near water, snow, and sand, which can reflect the sun's rays and increase the chances of sunburn.

Avoid tanning beds. The UV (ultraviolet) light from tanning beds can cause skin cancer and wrinkling.

Check your birthday suit on your birthday. Look at your skin carefully and if you see anything changing, growing, or bleeding on your skin, see your doctor.

Get vitamin D safely through a healthy diet (which may include vitamin supplements.) Don't seek out the sun.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) approves of the use of sunscreen on infants younger than 6 months old only if adequate clothing and shade are not available. Parents should still try to avoid sun exposure and dress the infant in lightweight clothing that covers most surface areas of skin. However, parents also may apply a minimal amount of sunscreen to the infant's face and back of the hands.

Remember, sand and pavement reflect UV rays even under the umbrella. Snow is even a particularly good reflector of UV rays.

How to perform a skin self-examination:

Finding suspicious moles or skin cancer early is the key to treating skin cancer successfully. A skin self-exam is usually the first step in detecting skin cancer. The following suggested method of self-examination comes from the American Cancer Society:

(You will need a full-length mirror, a hand mirror, and a brightly lit room.)

Treatments for skin cancer:

Specific treatment for skin cancer will be determined by your physician based on:

There are several kinds of treatments for skin cancer, including the following:

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