RWJ Health Connect | Patient PortalGo
  • 1-888-MD-RWJUH
  • YouTube

Health Library

Results 1 - 10 of 4567
Search Results:  B (4567)
  • Brain Harm May Last Long After College Football Players' Final Game

    Posted: 12/05/2016

    Brain Harm May Last Long After College Football Players' Final Game FRIDAY, Dec. 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Brain tissue thinning is still evident in former college football players several years after they stop playing, a new study finds. University of Cincinnati researchers conducted MRI scans of 11 former college players and found they had significantly less cortical thickness in parts of the frontal and temporal cortex of the brain, compared with former track-and-field athletes. "The former footbal...

  • Bonus From Your Blood Pressure Med: Fewer Fractures?

    Posted: 11/30/2016

    Bonus From Your Blood Pressure Med: Fewer Fractures? MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure and weakened bones are two big health issues for seniors. Now, new data suggests that one class of drugs might help protect against both. The study of thousands of Veterans Affairs (VA) and Medicare patients found that anti-hypertension meds called thiazide diuretics also seemed to lower odds of a patient suffering a hip or pelvic fracture, compared with people on other high blood pressure ...

  • Bagged Salads May Be Fertile Ground for Bacteria

    Posted: 11/28/2016

    Bagged Salads May Be Fertile Ground for Bacteria FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Prepackaged salads may promote the growth of salmonella bacteria, researchers report. They found that even slight damage to leaves in salad bags released juices that encouraged the spread of salmonella. These salad juices also boosted the bacteria's ability to form biofilms, which cling tightly to the surfaces they coat. This makes it hard to wash the bacteria off the produce, the researchers said. Most salad leaf...

  • Brain Implant Lets 'Locked-In' ALS Patient Communicate

    Posted: 11/21/2016

    Brain Implant Lets 'Locked-In' ALS Patient Communicate MONDAY, Nov. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A high-tech implant has enabled a paralyzed woman with late-stage ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) to communicate through brain signaling, researchers say. The degenerative disease robbed Hanneke De Bruijne, 58, of all voluntary muscle control -- including the ability to speak -- while leaving her mind intact. But an experimental implant-software program allows the "locked-in" Dutch woman to type words wi...

  • Blood Test May Someday Diagnose Concussion

    Posted: 11/17/2016

    Blood Test May Someday Diagnose Concussion FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A simple blood test may one day diagnose concussions with more than 90 percent certainty, a small Canadian study suggests. This new test is unique, the authors said, because it looks for more than 100 markers indicating that a concussion has occurred. In the past researchers looked for a single marker in the blood to indicate a concussion, they said. "We were pleasantly surprised, when we looked at the pattern of metabo...

  • Blood Test May Spot Babies at Risk for Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    Posted: 11/16/2016

    Blood Test May Spot Babies at Risk for Fetal Alcohol Syndrome WEDNESDAY, Nov. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A blood test on expectant mothers may help identify infants at risk for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), according to a new study. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders occur when women drink large amounts of alcohol during pregnancy. The condition can affect a child's development and cause long-lasting physical and mental health problems. Being able to identify infants at risk for FASD might lea...

  • Brain Scans May Improve Dementia Diagnosis, Treatment

    Posted: 11/15/2016

    Brain Scans May Improve Dementia Diagnosis, Treatment TUESDAY, Nov. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Tens of millions of people worldwide suffer from memory loss and mental impairment due to dementia. While there's no cure, medication may temporarily improve some symptoms. Proper treatment, however, depends on identifying the type of dementia and early detection. A new study shows that MRI brain scans can help doctors tell which people with certain thinking and memory problems might go on to develop dementia...

  • Balloon-in-a-Pill Helped Obese Patients Lose Weight

    Posted: 11/13/2016

    Balloon-in-a-Pill Helped Obese Patients Lose Weight FRIDAY, Nov. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Obese patients who swallowed balloon capsules that helped them eat less lost an average of 15 pounds, roughly two times more weight than patients who just dieted and exercised, researchers report. The capsule was inflated with gas via a catheter when it reached the stomach. As many as three balloons were placed over three months, and all of the balloons were removed after six months. The balloons made patients f...

  • Be Alert for PTSD After Pregnancy Loss

    Posted: 11/10/2016

    Be Alert for PTSD After Pregnancy Loss WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Post-traumatic stress disorder can develop in women after pregnancy loss, a new British study finds. Women who suffer a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy should be routinely screened for PTSD and receive mental health support, the researchers said. "We were surprised at the high number of women who experienced symptoms of PTSD after early pregnancy loss," said study lead author Jessica Farren, of the department of surgery ...

  • Breast, Cervical Cancer More Deadly in Developing Nations: Report

    Posted: 11/10/2016

    Breast, Cervical Cancer More Deadly in Developing Nations: Report WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women in developing countries are more likely to die of breast and cervical cancer than those in richer nations, researchers report. But, they added, many of the deaths in these low- and middle-income countries could be prevented with cost-effective treatment. "The global community cannot continue to ignore the problem -- hundreds of thousands of women are dying unnecessarily every year, and the...