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  • Brain Chip Helps Paralyzed 'Type' With Their Mind

    Posted: 02/25/2017

    Brain Chip Helps Paralyzed 'Type' With Their Mind TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A microchip implanted in the brain helped paralyzed patients "type" on a computer via mind control, at the fastest speeds yet seen in such experiments. It's the latest step forward in research on "brain-computer interface" systems. Scientists have been studying the technology, with the aim of giving patients with paralysis or limb amputations more independence in their daily lives. In the past several years, res...

  • Bleeding Strokes Take Heavy Toll on Brain

    Posted: 02/25/2017

    Bleeding Strokes Take Heavy Toll on Brain WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Survivors of the most deadly type of stroke face a higher risk for developing depression and dementia, new research suggests. Often called "bleeding strokes," hemorrhagic strokes occur when a blood vessel ruptures and leaks blood into the brain. Conversely, the more common ischemic stroke happens after a blood vessel is blocked in the brain. "Our study changes the way we look at depression after a hemorrhagic stroke,"...

  • Belly Fat More Dangerous in Older Women Than Being Overweight

    Posted: 02/25/2017

    Belly Fat More Dangerous in Older Women Than Being Overweight THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- In older women, it's not excess weight that's deadly, but where those extra pounds collect that can shorten life, a new study reports. Among women 70 to 79, being overweight or obese didn't appear to cut years off life -- unless the weight was centered around the waist. But being underweight also appeared to shorten life span, researchers found. "Abdominal fat is more deadly than carrying excess wei...

  • Beware Heart Attack Risk From Shoveling Snow

    Posted: 02/21/2017

    Beware Heart Attack Risk From Shoveling Snow MONDAY, Feb. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Shoveling is the probable reason why men are more likely to suffer a heart attack after a heavy snowfall, researchers report. In a new study, investigators analyzed data on heart attacks between the months of November and April in the province of Quebec between 1981 and 2014. About 60 percent of hospital admissions and deaths due to heart attack were in men. The findings showed that men's risk of heart attack hospital...

  • Be Your Child's Valentine

    Posted: 02/20/2017

    Be Your Child's Valentine SUNDAY, Feb. 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Valentine's Day is two days away, and it's a great day to show your kids a little extra loving, child health experts say. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) offers the following advice on making your kids feel special on the holiday and every day. Be positive and encouraging when talking with your children. Avoid mockery, sarcasm and put-downs. Set a good example on how to deal with other people and use words such as "I'm sorry," ...

  • Brain Differences Hint at Why Autism Is More Common in Males

    Posted: 02/16/2017

    Brain Differences Hint at Why Autism Is More Common in Males WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Structural differences in the male brain might explain why autism is more common in men than women, a new study suggests. Women were three times more likely to have autism spectrum disorder if their brain anatomy resembled more closely what is typically seen in male brains, the European researchers reported. "Specifically, these females had much thicker than normal cortical areas, a trait generally s...

  • Black Americans Still Undertreated for HIV

    Posted: 02/12/2017

    Black Americans Still Undertreated for HIV FRIDAY, Feb. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Although progress has been made, blacks in America are still being hit harder by HIV/AIDS, a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. The CDC study found that of more than 12,200 black men and women diagnosed with HIV in 2014, nearly 22 percent had progressed to AIDS by the time they were diagnosed. That means diagnosis and treatment is often coming too late. Moreover, among all black Ame...

  • Breast Density May Be Leading Indicator of Cancer Risk

    Posted: 02/09/2017

    Breast Density May Be Leading Indicator of Cancer Risk THURSDAY, Feb. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Women whose breasts are predominantly made up of more dense, glandular tissue face higher odds for breast cancer, a new study finds. The researchers added that, based on their study of 200,000 women, breast density may be the most important gauge of breast cancer risk, eclipsing family history of the disease and other risk factors. "The most significant finding in this study is the impact of breast density ...

  • Better Sleep Could Mean Better Sex for Older Women

    Posted: 02/09/2017

    Better Sleep Could Mean Better Sex for Older Women WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A more satisfying sex life may be only a good night's sleep away for women over 50, new research finds. Researchers led by Dr. Juliana Kling of the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., tracked data from nearly 94,000 women aged 50 to 79. The investigators found that 31 percent had insomnia, and a little more than half (56 percent) said they were somewhat or very satisfied with their sex life. But too little sleep...

  • Brain Scans May Shed Light on Bipolar Disorder-Suicide Risk

    Posted: 02/08/2017

    Brain Scans May Shed Light on Bipolar Disorder-Suicide Risk TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Among teens and young adults with bipolar disorder, researchers have linked brain differences to an increased suicide risk. About half of people with bipolar disorder -- marked by extreme mood swings -- attempt suicide and as many as one in five dies by suicide, the study authors said. For the new study, teens and young adults with bipolar disorder underwent brain scans. Compared with those who had not...