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  • Could a Daily Vitamin Curb Smog's Effect on the Heart?

    Posted: 04/23/2017

    Could a Daily Vitamin Curb Smog's Effect on the Heart? FRIDAY, April 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- There's a lot of evidence to show that breathing in dirty air can harm your heart. But a small new study suggests that daily vitamin B supplements might counteract that effect. While two hours of exposure to concentrated air pollution had a negative effect on heart rate and levels of illness-fighting white blood cells, "these effects are nearly reversed with four-week B-vitamin supplementation," according t...

  • Conflicting Statin Guidelines Leave Millions in 'Gray Zone'

    Posted: 04/23/2017

    Conflicting Statin Guidelines Leave Millions in 'Gray Zone' TUESDAY, April 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Conflicting guidelines on statin use could leave about 9 million Americans unsure about treatment, a new study suggests. Researchers estimate that if all doctors followed the latest guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) for the cholesterol-lowering drugs, the number of Americans aged 40 to 75 on statin medications would rise by 16 percent. In absolute numbers, that would mea...

  • Could Young Blood Boost the Aging Brain?

    Posted: 04/23/2017

    Could Young Blood Boost the Aging Brain? WEDNESDAY, April 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new study hints that young blood may harbor clues to a "fountain of youth" for older brains. Researchers say blood from human umbilical cords appears to have helped reverse memory loss in aging mice. The findings suggest that something in young blood is important in maintaining mental acuity. No one, however, is saying that cord blood could be a magic bullet against Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia. For one, a...

  • College Now the Place to Try Pot: Study

    Posted: 04/23/2017

    College Now the Place to Try Pot: Study THURSDAY, April 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- There may be new meaning to the term "higher" education: College has become a major setting for first-time pot use, new research contends. Undergrads are experimenting with marijuana in record numbers. And those who never tried pot are 51 percent more likely to experiment with the drug while on campus than those who don't go to college, said study author Richard Miech. He's a research professor with the University of Mi...

  • Could a Zap to the Brain Jog Failing Memory?

    Posted: 04/23/2017

    Could a Zap to the Brain Jog Failing Memory? THURSDAY, April 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Can a slight charge of electricity improve an ailing memory? Maybe, according to new research from the University of Pennsylvania. Timed correctly, deep brain stimulation can help people whose memory is lapsing. The treatment can restore the normal flow of "traffic patterns" in the brain, the study authors said. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a procedure that provides a mild electrical stimulation to certain areas...

  • Cleaning, Greening Vacant Lots May Help Fight Crime

    Posted: 04/23/2017

    Cleaning, Greening Vacant Lots May Help Fight Crime FRIDAY, April 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Tidying up that vacant lot in your community may help curb crime in the area, researchers say. In a new study, Michigan State University researchers compared crime statistics from 2005 through 2014 in Flint, Mich., with data from a greening program -- called the Clean and Green program -- in which thousands of abandoned lots were regularly mowed and maintained. "Generally speaking, I found that greening was mo...

  • Could Breast Milk Tests Replace Mammograms?

    Posted: 04/23/2017

    Could Breast Milk Tests Replace Mammograms? SATURDAY, April 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Breast-milk analysis may someday offer an alternative to mammograms for women in their childbearing years, new research suggests. Because mammography isn't well-suited to the dense breasts of younger women, scientists have begun looking for other viable breast-cancer screening tools. In a preliminary study, researchers report promising results with a new technique: evaluating breast milk for signs of cancer. "We hav...

  • Could a Clinical Trial Help Your Child?

    Posted: 04/20/2017

    Could a Clinical Trial Help Your Child? WEDNESDAY, April 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If a doctor suggests your child enroll in a clinical trial, you'll undoubtedly have questions. Probably lots of them. Clinical research trials are performed in children to develop age-specific treatments, and to assess the safety and/or effectiveness of drugs and vaccines in their smaller bodies. Participation is voluntary. Depending on the type of trial and product evaluated, participants may receive an experimental d...

  • Chemicals Found in Many U.S. Streams: Study

    Posted: 04/19/2017

    Chemicals Found in Many U.S. Streams: Study WEDNESDAY, April 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The mixture of pollutants in many U.S. streams are more complicated and potentially more dangerous than previously thought, a new study suggests. Researchers checked for 719 organic chemicals in water samples from 38 streams across the United States and found more than half of those chemicals in the different samples. Every stream -- even those in wild and uninhabited areas -- had at least one of the chemicals and ...

  • Chiropractors Not Magicians When It Comes to Chronic Back Pain

    Posted: 04/18/2017

    Chiropractors Not Magicians When It Comes to Chronic Back Pain TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Chiropractors can help ease some cases of low back pain, though their treatments may be no better than taking an over-the-counter pain reliever, a new analysis finds. The review of 26 clinical trials found that manipulating the spine can bring "modest" relief to people with acute low back pain -- pain that has lasted no more than six weeks. Chiropractors perform spinal manipulation, as do some doct...