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Search Results:  D (2050)
  • Do Diet Sodas Pose Health Risks?

    Posted: 04/26/2017

    Do Diet Sodas Pose Health Risks? THURSDAY, April 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- In the battle to lose weight, many people switch to diet sodas. But while they cut calories they might also raise the risk of stroke or dementia, a new study suggests. Just one artificially sweetened drink a day seems to increase those chances nearly threefold, compared with drinking less than one a week, the researchers said. Still, only a few people in the study developed dementia or had a stroke, so the absolute risk remain...

  • Don't Give Kids Medicines With Codeine, Tramadol: FDA

    Posted: 04/26/2017

    Don't Give Kids Medicines With Codeine, Tramadol: FDA THURSDAY, April 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Parents shouldn't give their children any medications containing the narcotics codeine or tramadol because they can cause life-threatening breathing problems, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Thursday. Warning labels on medications with codeine or tramadol will be strengthened to reflect these potential dangers, the FDA said in a statement. Nursing mothers should also avoid using these drugs, s...

  • Delay a Needed Colonoscopy at Your Own Risk

    Posted: 04/26/2017

    Delay a Needed Colonoscopy at Your Own Risk TUESDAY, April 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People who wait too long to get a colonoscopy after a "positive" screening test for colon cancer may face a heightened risk of the disease, a new study finds. The study asked a fundamental question: If a stool test suggests someone might have cancer, how long can someone safely wait to have a colonoscopy? Colonoscopy is a procedure that uses a thin, flexible tube with a camera on the end to allow your doctor to see i...

  • Don't Let Bugs Dampen Your Outdoor Fun

    Posted: 04/24/2017

    Don't Let Bugs Dampen Your Outdoor Fun SATURDAY, April 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If you've spent any time outdoors recently, you may have found yourself swatting away a fly or mosquito -- and that means it's time to bone up on bug avoidance. "Although most bug bites are harmless, some can spread dangerous diseases like Zika virus, dengue, Lyme disease and malaria," said Dr. Lindsay Strowd, an assistant professor of dermatology at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C. "Particularly...

  • Don't Let Ticks Get Under Your Skin

    Posted: 04/20/2017

    Don't Let Ticks Get Under Your Skin THURSDAY, April 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Just like people, ticks get more active as the weather gets warmer. So be sure to take steps to protect yourself against picking up an eight-legged hitchhiker when you're outdoors. "From now on until next winter what you should do is, when you go out -- especially if you are going to walk a pet or go out for a hike anywhere where there is a little bit of vegetation -- you want to have long pants and closed shoes," said Kate...

  • Do Marathons' Road Closures Lead to More Local Deaths?

    Posted: 04/20/2017

    Do Marathons' Road Closures Lead to More Local Deaths? WEDNESDAY, April 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- When a marathon shuts down city streets, it's more than an inconvenience: Nearby residents appear more likely to die from heart attack and cardiac arrest, a new study finds. The study, of 11 U.S. cities, found that older residents were less likely to survive the heart events on marathon days, compared to other days, perhaps due to delays in receiving care. Older people who landed in the hospital on a rac...

  • Diabetes Continues Its Relentless Rise

    Posted: 04/20/2017

    Diabetes Continues Its Relentless Rise WEDNESDAY, April 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Two new studies on diabetes deliver good and bad news, but the overall message is that the blood sugar disease remains a formidable public health burden. The first study looked at the incidence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in U.S. children, and uncovered this troubling trend: From 2002 to 2012, the rates for both types of diabetes increased, especially among racial and ethnic minorities. But a bit of hope was offered u...

  • Deep Brain Stimulation May Ease Tourette 'Tics'

    Posted: 04/18/2017

    Deep Brain Stimulation May Ease Tourette 'Tics' TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Some young people with severe cases of Tourette syndrome may benefit from having electrodes implanted in the brain, a small study suggests. The procedure, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS), has long been used to treat certain cases of Parkinson's disease and other brain-based disorders. But DBS is still considered experimental in the context of Tourette syndrome -- a disorder that causes people to habitually ...

  • Don't Bank on Heart-Rate Accuracy From Your Activity Tracker

    Posted: 04/18/2017

    Don't Bank on Heart-Rate Accuracy From Your Activity Tracker MONDAY, April 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Wrist-worn activity trackers such as Fitbit don't reliably assess heart rate, a new study finds. While the devices may have some legitimate benefits, they shouldn't be used for medical purposes, researchers suggest. Evaluating four wearable activity trackers from Fitbit, Basis and Mio, the investigators compared results to those from an electrocardiograph (EKG). The researchers found results varied am...

  • Droughts Tied to Climate Change Could Bring Health Risks for Seniors

    Posted: 04/13/2017

    Droughts Tied to Climate Change Could Bring Health Risks for Seniors WEDNESDAY, April 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Severe drought can put older people at added risk of heart and lung illness -- and even death, a new study finds. Scientists forecast more droughts in the United States as climate change patterns continue. In the new study, researchers analyzed health and drought data from 618 counties in the western United States. The data included hospitalizations for heart- and lung-related problems as we...