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  • Insecticide Spraying Working Against Florida's Zika Mosquitoes: Officials

    Posted: 09/28/2016

    Insecticide Spraying Working Against Florida's Zika Mosquitoes: Officials FRIDAY, Sept. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Aerial spraying of insecticides seems to be stopping the spread of the Zika virus in south Florida, health officials said Friday. Seventy-four confirmed cases of the mosquito-borne infection that causes devastating birth defects have been reported in the state, the only state in the nation to report any local infections. A combination of insecticides was needed to beat back the Aedes aegy...

  • Is Morning Sickness a Good Thing?

    Posted: 09/28/2016

    Is Morning Sickness a Good Thing? MONDAY, Sept. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- While morning sickness may make you miserable in the early months of your pregnancy, it can signal that your baby is healthy and normal, new research shows. In the study, those who endured the nausea and vomiting of morning sickness were 50 percent to 75 percent less likely to experience a pregnancy loss. The review focused on women who'd already lost one or two pregnancies. "This should be reassuring for women experiencing the...

  • Internet Addiction May Be Red Flag for Other Mental Health Issues: Study

    Posted: 09/26/2016

    Internet Addiction May Be Red Flag for Other Mental Health Issues: Study SUNDAY, Sept. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Internet addiction may signal other mental health issues among college students, according to a new study. Canadian researchers say their findings could affect how psychiatrists approach people who spend a significant amount of time online. For the study, the researchers evaluated the internet use of 254 freshmen at McMaster University in Ontario. The researchers used a tool called the Int...

  • Is Summer Peak Time for Diabetes Tied to Pregnancy?

    Posted: 09/20/2016

    Is Summer Peak Time for Diabetes Tied to Pregnancy? TUESDAY, Sept. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Gestational diabetes -- which arises during pregnancy -- may be more common in the summer than in other seasons, new Swedish research suggests. The study couldn't prove a cause-and-effect relationship between seasons and gestational diabetes rates. However, the researchers reported that rates of the condition jumped from about 3 percent of pregnancies in March, to almost 6 percent in June. One U.S. expert sai...

  • Immune Therapy Makes Headway Against a Lymphoma

    Posted: 09/15/2016

    Immune Therapy Makes Headway Against a Lymphoma THURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Genetically engineered immune cells appear capable of eradicating non-Hodgkin lymphoma when coupled with effective chemotherapy, a new early trial finds. In this experimental therapy, white blood cells known as T-cells are removed from the patient's bloodstream. Then they're genetically modified so they can detect and attack cancerous B-cells, another type of white blood cell in which most types of non-Hodgkin ly...

  • Immune-Based Drug May Ease Chronic Eye Condition

    Posted: 09/14/2016

    Immune-Based Drug May Ease Chronic Eye Condition WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People with chronic eye inflammation known as uveitis may be able to keep the condition at bay with the immune-suppressing drug Humira (adalimumab), a new study finds. "Humira doesn't cure uveitis, but it does cause it to become quiet," said lead researcher Dr. Glenn Jaffe. He's a professor of ophthalmology at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, N.C., and a consultant for Humira's maker, AbbVie. "The ...

  • Intensive Type 2 Diabetes Treatment Can Extend Survival: Study

    Posted: 09/14/2016

    Intensive Type 2 Diabetes Treatment Can Extend Survival: Study WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive management of type 2 diabetes can make a difference in how long and how well you live, even if you don't start until middle age, researchers report. People who were already at risk of type 2 diabetes complications were randomly selected to continue with their normal treatment or to be placed in an aggressive and multipronged treatment group. Two decades after the study began, the researc...

  • Injury Risk Spikes While Cancer Patients Seek Diagnosis: Study

    Posted: 09/10/2016

    Injury Risk Spikes While Cancer Patients Seek Diagnosis: Study THURSDAY, Sept. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer patients face an added risk of injuries while their condition is being diagnosed, a new study says. The findings show the need for more effort to prevent both accidental and other types of injuries while patients await a diagnosis, according to the researchers. Led by Qing Shen, a postgraduate student in the department of medical epidemiology and biostatistics at Karolinska Institute in Stoc...

  • In Mice, a Way for Stem Cells to Build Bone

    Posted: 09/08/2016

    In Mice, a Way for Stem Cells to Build Bone WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they've found an easy way to spur stem cells to build bone in mice -- a discovery that could lead to new treatments for bone disease. The team of scientists from the University of California, San Diego used a naturally occurring molecule called adenosine to prompt human stem cells to regenerate bone tissue. The new tissue helped repair cranial bone defects in the mice. Stem cells can become any type ...

  • iPads Calm Surgery-Bound Kids as Well as Sedatives

    Posted: 09/07/2016

    iPads Calm Surgery-Bound Kids as Well as Sedatives TUESDAY, Aug. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Savvy parents probably already suspect it: iPads work as well as sedative drugs to calm anxious kids before surgery, a new study shows. Researchers assessed 112 children between 4 and 10 years old in France who had day surgery requiring general anesthesia. Twenty minutes before receiving the anesthesia, 54 kids were given the sedative midazolam and 58 were handed an iPad to distract them. Anxiety levels in both...