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  • Little Threat of Zika Spread From Rio Olympics: Study

    Posted: 07/29/2016

    Little Threat of Zika Spread From Rio Olympics: Study MONDAY, July 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Travelers and competitors at the 2016 Olympic Games in Brazil are not likely to contract the Zika virus during their stay or bring it back to their home countries, Yale University experts contend in a new report. Fear of the mosquito-borne virus has led some athletes to skip the games, which start Aug. 5 in Rio de Janeiro. U.S. cyclist Tejay van Garderen withdrew from Olympic consideration because of the pote...

  • Later Start, Finish to Menstruation May Extend Women's Lives

    Posted: 07/29/2016

    Later Start, Finish to Menstruation May Extend Women's Lives WEDNESDAY, July 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women whose periods begin later and who experience menopause later in life are more likely to live to be 90, new research suggests. "Our study found that women who started menstruation at age 12 or older, experienced menopause, either naturally or surgically, at age 50 or older and had more than 40 reproductive years had increased odds of living to 90 years old," said study author Aladdin Shadyab. H...

  • Lack of Fitness Second Only to Smoking as Predictor of Early Death: Study

    Posted: 07/29/2016

    Lack of Fitness Second Only to Smoking as Predictor of Early Death: Study WEDNESDAY, July 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Poor physical fitness ranks right behind smoking as leading risk factors for an early death, new long-term research suggests. Analyzing nearly 800 men starting at midlife, Swedish scientists also found that each measurable increase in fitness levels translated into a 21 percent lower risk of death over 45 years of follow-up. "Fitness in middle age is of importance for mortality risk for...

  • Living Past 90 Doesn't Doom You to Disease, Disability

    Posted: 07/29/2016

    Living Past 90 Doesn't Doom You to Disease, Disability THURSDAY, July 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- What if you could live well into your 90s and still be in good health? A new study suggests that may be possible, particularly if you have good genes. "Chronic disease is not an inevitable part of aging," said Dr. Sofiya Milman, an assistant professor of medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. "An extended period of good health can accompany a long life span and is an achievab...

  • Low-Nicotine Cigarettes Won't Necessarily Help Smokers Stop

    Posted: 08/03/2015

    Low-Nicotine Cigarettes Won't Necessarily Help Smokers Stop SATURDAY, July 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Low-nicotine cigarettes alone don't help smokers quit over the long term, a new study finds. "We don't know that very low-nicotine cigarettes will not reduce nicotine dependence, but progressively reducing nicotine content of cigarettes in the way that we did, without other means of supporting smokers, did not produce the desired results," study leader Dr. Neal Benowitz, a professor in the departments...

  • Less-Invasive Repair of Aortic Aneurysm Better in Short Term: Study

    Posted: 07/30/2015

    Less-Invasive Repair of Aortic Aneurysm Better in Short Term: Study WEDNESDAY, July 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Minimally invasive surgery to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm appears to boost survival in the short term more than traditional surgery does, but that advantage diminishes over time, researchers report. An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a bulging weak spot in the aorta, the large artery that takes blood away from the heart and toward the abdomen, pelvis and legs. If not fixed, it can burst ...

  • Low Birth Weight Tied to Higher Type 2 Diabetes Risk Decades Later

    Posted: 07/28/2015

    Low Birth Weight Tied to Higher Type 2 Diabetes Risk Decades Later TUESDAY, July 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Your risk for type 2 diabetes might be affected by both your birth weight and your lifestyle, a new study suggests. "We found that both low birth weight and unhealthy lifestyle were associated with a significantly higher risk of type 2 diabetes," study leader Dr. Lu Qi, associate professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, and colleagues said in a news r...

  • Loneliness May Fuel Mental Decline in Old Age

    Posted: 07/27/2015

    Loneliness May Fuel Mental Decline in Old Age MONDAY, July 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Loneliness and depression are linked to an increased risk of mental decline in the elderly, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed data from more than 8,300 American adults aged 65 and older who were assessed every two years between 1998 and 2010. Seventeen percent reported loneliness at the beginning of the study, and half of those who were lonely had depression. Over the course of the study, mental decline was ...

  • Lung Cancer Patients Who Quit Smoking Live Longer

    Posted: 07/23/2015

    Lung Cancer Patients Who Quit Smoking Live Longer THURSDAY, July 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Lung cancer patients live longer if they quit smoking around the time of their cancer diagnosis, a new study finds. Researchers looked at 250 lung cancer patients who were smokers and were referred to a program to help them stop smoking. Fifty had recently quit smoking, and 71 had quit smoking soon after being referred to the tobacco cessation program. Those who quit smoking shortly before or after they learned...

  • Less Education May Mean Shorter Lifespan, Study Suggests

    Posted: 07/15/2015

    Less Education May Mean Shorter Lifespan, Study Suggests WEDNESDAY, July 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A low level of education may be hazardous to your long-term well-being, a new study suggests. Based on analysis of more than 1 million Americans, the study investigators estimated that more than 145,000 deaths could have been prevented in 2010 if adults who hadn't graduated from high school had earned a GED or high school degree. The researchers also estimated that about 110,000 deaths could have been pr...