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  • Scientists Explore Possible Way to Stop Zika in Its Tracks

    Posted: 06/25/2016

    Scientists Explore Possible Way to Stop Zika in Its Tracks FRIDAY, June 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists say they've identified a potential way to prevent Zika and similar viruses from spreading in the body. They pinpointed a gene pathway that is vital for Zika and related viruses to spread infection between cells. The researchers found that shutting down a single gene in this pathway prevents these viruses from leaving an infected cell. "We wanted to find out if we could identify genes present i...

  • Sleep Loses Out for Many Hooked on Video Games

    Posted: 06/25/2016

    Sleep Loses Out for Many Hooked on Video Games FRIDAY, June 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Are video games like "Bloodborne," "Fallout" and "Call of Duty" worth losing sleep over? For plenty of gamers, the answer is yes. A new study of almost 1,000 gamers finds many will sacrifice sleep to continue playing, suggesting video games are addictive for some people, the researchers said. "Our data shows that video gaming is quite an important factor that frequently leads to missed sleep for 67 percent of gamers...

  • Scans May Spare Some Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients From Chemo

    Posted: 06/25/2016

    Scans May Spare Some Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients From Chemo THURSDAY, June 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A certain type of medical scan can be used to help spare some Hodgkin lymphoma patients from the severe side effects of chemotherapy, a new study suggests. Researchers found that PET imaging can identify patients whose Hodgkin lymphoma will likely respond better to treatment, and therefore require less intensive chemotherapy. "The good news is that the majority of people diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma ...

  • Sprained Ankle Could Pose Longer-Term Harms to Health

    Posted: 06/25/2016

    Sprained Ankle Could Pose Longer-Term Harms to Health THURSDAY, June 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many Americans have suffered through an ankle break or sprain, but new research suggests these injuries might have a larger effect on health. The study, based on a survey of thousands of adults, found that people with injured ankles tend to have higher rates of disability and arthritis, heart or respiratory issues going forward. The study can't prove cause-and-effect, but it points to the importance of prop...

  • Southern States Lagging in Tough Smoking Bans, CDC Says

    Posted: 06/25/2016

    Southern States Lagging in Tough Smoking Bans, CDC Says THURSDAY, June 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Smokers in southern states can still find plenty of places to spread secondhand smoke to others, a new report finds. In fact, no states in the U.S. Southeast have comprehensive smoke-free laws to protect nonsmokers from tobacco fumes, a federal government report says. This type of law bans smoking in all indoor areas of workplaces, restaurants and bars. Dr. Tom Frieden directs the U.S. Centers for Disease...

  • Smoking May Hinder Common Breast Cancer Treatment

    Posted: 06/25/2016

    Smoking May Hinder Common Breast Cancer Treatment FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking may blunt the effectiveness of a certain kind of breast cancer treatment, new research suggests. Among breast cancer patients taking a class of drugs called aromatase inhibitors, smokers had a three times greater risk of their cancer returning than nonsmokers, the investigators found. However, the study could not prove a cause-and-effect link. Smoking had little or no effect on the benefit of other drugs,...

  • Single Working Moms Carry a Heart Burden

    Posted: 06/25/2016

    Single Working Moms Carry a Heart Burden THURSDAY, June 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Single working moms, who are often pressed for time and money, may have to worry about their heart health, too. Compared to married mothers with jobs, single working mothers in the United States have a higher risk of heart disease and stroke, researchers found. They're also more likely to smoke -- a known heart risk -- than women with other work and family patterns, said Frank van Lenthe, co-author of the new study. Los...

  • Stem Cell Transplant Can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma: Study

    Posted: 06/23/2016

    Stem Cell Transplant Can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma: Study WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People living with HIV are at high risk for lymphoma, and a new study concludes that stem cell transplant should be standard treatment in these cases. The transplants should be "autologous" -- meaning the cells come from the patients themselves, the researchers said. The new findings could challenge the widely held belief that HIV-positive patients are not candidates for this therapy. Instead...

  • Skin Cancer Check? Do Some Sole-Searching

    Posted: 06/23/2016

    Skin Cancer Check? Do Some Sole-Searching WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sunlight is considered the leading cause of melanoma, but daily wear-and-tear appears to promote the deadly skin cancer in at least one place where the sun rarely shines, researchers say. Stress and damage caused by walking or running could be a risk factor for melanoma on the soles of the feet, the Japanese researchers contended. Worse, because people don't think to check for melanoma on their soles, when the cancer ...

  • Shouting? The 'Silent Treatment'? How Spouses Argue Linked to Physical Ills

    Posted: 06/22/2016

    Shouting? The 'Silent Treatment'? How Spouses Argue Linked to Physical Ills TUESDAY, June 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- How spouses disagree may predict which ones are more likely to develop certain ailments down the road, new research suggests. Analyzing 156 older couples over 20 years, scientists found that patterns of angry outbursts raised the risk of heart problems, while emotional withdrawal or "stonewalling" could lead to musculoskeletal issues such as back pain or stiff neck. "We've known for a l...