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  • Zika Infection Shrinks Testicles in Mice

    Posted: 02/26/2017

    Zika Infection Shrinks Testicles in Mice WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Zika virus can be sexually transmitted through semen, and a new mouse study could help explain why that occurs -- and how the virus might damage male fertility. In lab research, Zika attacked the testicles of mice, targeting cells that produce the male hormone testosterone and ultimately causing testes to shrink, the researchers said. These findings "explain the persistence of the virus in semen," said Dr. Amesh Adalja...

  • Zika Lingers in Semen for Less Time Than Thought: Study

    Posted: 02/22/2017

    Zika Lingers in Semen for Less Time Than Thought: Study TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests the Zika virus lingers in a man's semen no longer than three months in almost all cases. Still, guidelines from the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention recommend that infected men use condoms or abstain from sex for six months after infection with the Zika virus. Infectious disease experts said those guidelines should stay that way. "Better to err on the long end," said Mat...

  • Zika Fears, Opioid Abuse Crisis Top Health News for 2016

    Posted: 01/08/2017

    Zika Fears, Opioid Abuse Crisis Top Health News for 2016 THURSDAY, Dec. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When news reports first began to emerge of mysterious, severe birth defects in Brazilian newborns, few could have imagined these isolated tragedies would explode into the leading health news story of 2016: the Zika virus. Soon, those few Brazilian cases of microcephaly -- babies born with abnormally small heads and underdeveloped brains -- grew to become thousands. Doctors quickly made the link between m...

  • Zika Still a Threat During Winter Months

    Posted: 12/20/2016

    Zika Still a Threat During Winter Months TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Winter doesn't necessarily mean the end of the Zika threat in the United States, a public health expert says. Zika is transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Their eggs can survive in conditions that kill adult mosquitoes, explained Dr. James Diaz. He is program director of Environmental/Occupational Health Sciences at Louisiana State University's School of Public Health in New Orleans. "Not only can the eggs of Aedes s...

  • Zika-Linked Birth Defects Surge in Colombia: CDC

    Posted: 12/18/2016

    Zika-Linked Birth Defects Surge in Colombia: CDC FRIDAY, Dec. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The tragedy of hundreds of babies born with devastating birth defects linked to the Zika virus is no longer confined to Brazil, a new report confirms. Colombia is now also experiencing a surge in these cases of infant microcephaly. It's a birth defect where newborns whose mothers contracted the mosquito-borne virus in pregnancy are born with too-small skulls and underdeveloped brains. A team led by Margaret Honein,...

  • Zika Babies May Look Normal at Birth, Display Brain Defects Later: CDC

    Posted: 11/30/2016

    Zika Babies May Look Normal at Birth, Display Brain Defects Later: CDC TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Babies exposed to the Zika virus in the womb can look normal at birth but later show signs of the devastating birth defect microcephaly and other brain abnormalities, researchers reported Tuesday. Scientists found that 13 infants in Brazil who were exposed to the mosquito-borne virus during gestation had normal head size as newborns, but subsequently experienced slower head growth. Eleven of...

  • Zika No Longer 'Global Health Emergency,' WHO Says

    Posted: 11/28/2016

    Zika No Longer 'Global Health Emergency,' WHO Says FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Zika, the mosquito-borne virus that can cause severe birth defects in the infants of infected mothers, is no longer a "global health emergency," the United Nation's World Health Organization (WHO) declared Friday. A WHO advisory panel said that while the spread of Zika remains of great importance, it should now be classed with other mosquito-borne maladies such as malaria or yellow fever, The New York Times repo...

  • Zika Can Survive on Hard Surfaces for Hours

    Posted: 11/22/2016

    Zika Can Survive on Hard Surfaces for Hours TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- It's well known that the Zika virus can be transmitted through mosquito bites or, more rarely, sexual contact. Now, new research raises the prospect that the virus might be able to survive for several hours on hard, nonporous surfaces such as countertops, floors and doorknobs. There's good news, too, however: Common disinfectants are highly effective at killing any Zika that lands on these surfaces, the researchers sa...

  • Zika Testing for All Pregnant Women Who Have Been in Florida County: CDC

    Posted: 10/29/2016

    Zika Testing for All Pregnant Women Who Have Been in Florida County: CDC THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. health officials are now recommending that all pregnant women who have recently spent time in any part of Miami-Dade County in Florida be tested for Zika infection. Previously, testing had only been urged for pregnant women who had been in areas of the county where Zika had been spreading locally. This latest advisory extends that recommendation to the entire county and covers the pe...

  • Zika Infection May Bring Future Immunity: Study

    Posted: 10/23/2016

    Zika Infection May Bring Future Immunity: Study FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People who've been infected with Zika face a low risk for another bout with the virus that can cause birth defects, a new study contends. "The research shows that infection provides excellent protection against reinfection," Stephen Higgs, director of the Biosecurity Research Institute at Kansas State University, said in a university news release. "This means people infected during this current epidemic will likely...