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  • Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Detected in Sewage Spill

    Posted: 07/29/2016

    Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Detected in Sewage Spill FRIDAY, July 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sewer line breaks can release antibiotic-resistant bacteria that pose a public health threat, a new study says. Consider the 2014 sewer line break in St. Petersburg, Fla., that released 500,000 gallons of untreated wastewater into neighborhoods and Boca Ciega Bay. University of South Florida researchers who did follow-up testing of soil and water said they detected genes from vancomycin-resistant bacteria fo...

  • Are Stroke Centers Life Savers?

    Posted: 07/29/2016

    Are Stroke Centers Life Savers? TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The odds of surviving a stroke are slightly better for patients treated at hospitals with a specialized stroke department, known as primary stroke centers, a new study finds. But that benefit was only seen if stroke patients got to a stroke center in less than 90 minutes, the study authors said. "Treatment of stroke is very time sensitive. As the saying goes, time is brain," said lead researcher Dr. Kimon Bekelis. "So the faster ...

  • Adlyxin Approved for Type 2 Diabetes

    Posted: 07/29/2016

    Adlyxin Approved for Type 2 Diabetes THURSDAY, July 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adlyxin (lixisenatide) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat type 2 diabetes in adults, the agency said Thursday in a news release. As the FDA explained, Adlyxin is a "glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist" -- a hormonal drug that helps control blood sugar. The drug was evaluated in clinical studies involving 5,400 people with type 2 diabetes. A separate study was held involving 6,000 type 2...

  • Alcohol, Obesity Could Raise Esophageal Cancer Risk

    Posted: 07/29/2016

    Alcohol, Obesity Could Raise Esophageal Cancer Risk THURSDAY, July 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking plus being overweight may be a bad combo when it comes to risks for the two most common types of esophageal cancer, a new report warns. The findings suggest that in the United States, a third of esophageal cancer cases -- that's about 5,600 per year -- could be prevented if people maintained a healthy weight and didn't drink. "These findings add to the evidence that lifestyle plays a powerful role in...

  • Are Unemployed Husbands Fueling Divorce Rates?

    Posted: 07/29/2016

    Are Unemployed Husbands Fueling Divorce Rates? THURSDAY, July 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to common belief, a new U.S. study suggests that women's growing role in the workforce is not a major factor in divorce. But a husband's ability to keep a full-time job might be. The study, of over 6,300 U.S. couples, found that the odds of divorce were no different whether a wife worked full-time or not. Instead, it was husbands' full-time employment -- or lack thereof -- that made a significant differen...

  • After Breast Cancer, Many in Appalachia Say No to Lifesaving Drugs

    Posted: 08/04/2015

    After Breast Cancer, Many in Appalachia Say No to Lifesaving Drugs MONDAY, July 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About one-third of breast cancer survivors in the Appalachian region of the United States do not take potentially lifesaving drugs, even though their drugs are covered by insurance, a new study finds. The study included 428 breast cancer survivors in the Appalachian counties of Kentucky, Ohio, North Carolina and Pennsylvania. All of the women had Medicare Part D insurance that covers prescription...

  • Are Hospitals Overusing Neonatal Intensive Care?

    Posted: 08/04/2015

    Are Hospitals Overusing Neonatal Intensive Care? MONDAY, July 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new report finds that more babies are being treated in neonatal intensive care units at many U.S. hospitals, and the infants are bigger and less premature. While they don't know for sure, researchers suggest this is a potential sign that these expensive interventions are being overused. The report authors analyzed nearly 18 million births from 2007-2012, and found that the number of babies who were treated in ne...

  • Americans Becoming More Accepting of Gays, Lesbians, Study Finds

    Posted: 08/03/2015

    Americans Becoming More Accepting of Gays, Lesbians, Study Finds MONDAY, July 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Bias against gays and lesbians is falling among Americans, a new study finds. "Many people have this gut feeling that our culture has changed. We wondered whether people's attitudes were really changing, or if people today just feel more pressure to say they support lesbian and gay people," lead researcher Erin Westgate, a doctoral psychology student at the University of Virginia, said in a univers...

  • Added Radiation May Help Some With Early Breast Cancer

    Posted: 07/30/2015

    Added Radiation May Help Some With Early Breast Cancer WEDNESDAY, July 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some women who have surgery for early stage breast cancer may benefit from additional radiation to nearby lymph nodes, two new clinical trials suggest. Researchers found that the extra radiation cut women's risk of a breast cancer recurrence over the next decade. It did not, however, extend their lives. The studies, both reported in the July 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine , aimed to answe...

  • Access to Doctors Eases in Michigan After Obamacare

    Posted: 07/29/2015

    Access to Doctors Eases in Michigan After Obamacare WEDNESDAY, July 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Getting a doctor's appointment in Michigan actually became easier after Medicaid was expanded, even though hundreds of thousands of people became newly insured, new research finds. "This study illustrates that although fewer practices accept Medicaid than accept private insurance, expanding access to coverage in Michigan has not made it more difficult to get an appointment as a new patient. That is good news...