RWJ Health Connect | Patient PortalGo
  • 1-888-MD-RWJUH
  • YouTube

Health Library

Results 1 - 10 of 1257
Search Results:  i (1257)
  • Is Kindergarten Now the New First Grade?

    Posted: 04/22/2017

    Is Kindergarten the New First Grade? SUNDAY, April 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The next time you hear a parent bragging about what an exceptional reader little Johnny or Jane is, it might actually be true. New research suggests there has been significant improvement in the reading skills of kids entering first grade in the United States. "Children are better prepared when they enter first grade than they used to be. Kindergarten is the new first grade when it comes to learning reading skills," said stu...

  • Is That Your Doctor Swearing, Drinking on Facebook?

    Posted: 04/22/2017

    Is That Your Doctor Swearing, Drinking on Facebook? MONDAY, April 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Not even doctors are immune from inappropriate social media posts. Young doctors often have "unprofessional" or offensive content on their Facebook profiles, a new study suggests. The study, of newly graduated urologists, found that nearly three-quarters had publicly identifiable Facebook profiles. And 40 percent of them contained unprofessional or "potentially objectionable" content. That ranged from profanit...

  • Illness From 'Kissing Bug' Now Widespread in U.S.

    Posted: 04/22/2017

    Illness From 'Kissing Bug' Now Widespread in U.S. TUESDAY, April 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- It's spread by an insect that's often called the "kissing bug." And now, the parasitic infection know as Chagas disease is prevalent in the United States, new research shows. Investigators tested nearly 5,000 Latin American-born residents of Los Angeles County in California. They found that 1.3 percent had Chagas disease, which can cause life-threatening heart damage if not treated early. "Less than 1 percent w...

  • Is It Wise to Take a Steroid for a Sore Throat?

    Posted: 04/22/2017

    Is It Wise to Take a Steroid for a Sore Throat? TUESDAY, April 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers seeking new sore throat treatments report only modest success with a single dose of a steroid medication. Concerns about growing bacterial resistance to antibiotics have led scientists to look for alternative therapies for sore throat, a common reason for doctor visits. In this new British study, a steroid medication led to improvement in about one-third of patients with sore throat. But, two U.S. phy...

  • Is Annual Eye Exam a Must for People With Type 1 Diabetes?

    Posted: 04/22/2017

    Is Annual Eye Exam a Must for People With Type 1 Diabetes? WEDNESDAY, April 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with type 1 diabetes face the risk of developing a disease that can cause blindness, so treatment guidelines have long called for annual eye exams. But new research suggests this one-size-fits-all advice is costly and ineffective, because people with a low risk may need less-frequent screenings while people at high risk may need to be seen more often. Diabetic retinopathy can damage the light-...

  • Immune-Based Therapy Shows Early Promise Against MS

    Posted: 04/22/2017

    Immune-Based Therapy Shows Early Promise Against MS THURSDAY, April 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental immune-system therapy appears safe for people with progressive forms of multiple sclerosis. And it may ease symptoms in some, a preliminary study suggests. The findings are based on just six patients, and the Australian researchers stressed that a lot of work still lies ahead. But they were encouraged that this new approach to MS had no major side effects. In addition, three of the six patien...

  • It's Yoga to the Rescue for Prostate Cancer Patients

    Posted: 04/20/2017

    It's Yoga to the Rescue for Prostate Cancer Patients THURSDAY, April 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hold that pose: New research suggests yoga may help men deal with the side effects of prostate cancer therapy. Novice yoga practitioners had renewed energy and fewer of the sexual and urinary symptoms tied to radiation treatment, compared with men who didn't use the technique, the study found. "Levels of patient-reported fatigue are expected to increase by around the fourth or fifth week of a typical treatm...

  • Is 'Desktop Medicine' Chipping Away at Patient Care?

    Posted: 04/19/2017

    Is 'Desktop Medicine' Chipping Away at Patient Care? TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians spend roughly as many hours on computer work as they do meeting with patients, a new study reveals. The findings are based on the daily habits of nearly 500 U.S. doctors. On average, they clocked about 3 hours with patients and around 3 hours on so-called desktop medicine, the researchers found. One doctor said the study provides grist for those who believe the American health system burdens physi...

  • Is Surgery Always Necessary for Gallstones?

    Posted: 04/16/2017

    Is Surgery Always Necessary for Gallstones? FRIDAY, April 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Gallbladder removal may not always necessary for gallstone pancreatitis, a new study suggests. Gallstone pancreatitis occurs when one or more gallstones gets stuck in a duct in the pancreas. This blocks pancreatic enzymes from leaving the pancreas and traveling to the small intestine to aid in digestion. When those enzymes back up into the pancreas, it causes inflammation and pain, according to the American College of ...

  • Infections More Common in People With Schizophrenia

    Posted: 04/12/2017

    Infections More Common in People With Schizophrenia MONDAY, April 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with schizophrenia may face an increased risk for serious infections, a new study suggests. "The preliminary data results suggest that individuals with schizophrenia have higher prevalence of all types of severe infections compared to the background population," study author Monika Pankiewicz-Dulacz, from the University of Southern Denmark, and colleagues wrote. "Clinicians should be aware that people wi...