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  • Limit Kids' Exposure to Media Violence, Pediatricians Say

    Posted: 07/25/2016

    Limit Kids' Exposure to Media Violence, Pediatricians Say MONDAY, July 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Media violence has become a routine part of the daily lives of American children, and parents, lawmakers and the media should take steps to change that, a leading pediatricians' group recommends. The new policy statement, from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), calls on pediatricians to routinely ask about children's "media diet," and for parents to limit the violent content their kids see -- wheth...

  • Latest Zika Puzzle: How U.S. Patient Infected Caregiver

    Posted: 07/25/2016

    Latest Zika Puzzle: How U.S. Patient Infected Caregiver MONDAY, July 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The mysterious Zika virus continues to surprise health scientists. On Monday, U.S. health officials said they were trying to determine how a now-deceased elderly Utah man who had Zika managed to infect a family caregiver. Zika is normally spread by mosquitoes and can also be transmitted sexually. But health officials said neither appears to have played a role in this case. For one thing, the disease-spreadi...

  • Living Past 90 Doesn't Doom You to Disease, Disability

    Posted: 07/25/2016

    Living Past 90 Doesn't Doom You to Disease, Disability THURSDAY, July 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- What if you could live well into your 90s and still be in good health? A new study suggests that may be possible, particularly if you have good genes. "Chronic disease is not an inevitable part of aging," said Dr. Sofiya Milman, an assistant professor of medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. "An extended period of good health can accompany a long life span and is an achievab...

  • Little Threat of Zika Spread From Rio Olympics: Study

    Posted: 07/25/2016

    Little Threat of Zika Spread From Rio Olympics: Study MONDAY, July 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Travelers and competitors at the 2016 Olympic Games in Brazil are not likely to contract the Zika virus during their stay or bring it back to their home countries, Yale University experts contend in a new report. Fear of the mosquito-borne virus has led some athletes to skip the games, which start Aug. 5 in Rio de Janeiro. U.S. cyclist Tejay van Garderen withdrew from Olympic consideration because of the pote...

  • Latin America Zika Outbreak Should 'Burn Out' Within 3 Years, Scientists Say

    Posted: 07/21/2016

    Latin America Zika Outbreak Should 'Burn Out' Within 3 Years, Scientists Say THURSDAY, July 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A team of British experts in disease outbreaks believes that the Zika epidemic afflicting Latin America will end within three years. They based their estimate on modeling using available data on the outbreak, which has so far involved thousands of cases of Zika-linked birth defects, mainly in Brazil. The Zika virus is typically spread by mosquito bites. For most people the health risk...

  • London's Great Smog of 1952 Linked to Asthma Surge

    Posted: 07/17/2016

    London's Great Smog of 1952 Linked to Asthma Surge FRIDAY, July 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- London's Great Smog of 1952 might have affected the health of young children and unborn babies, resulting in thousands of additional cases of asthma, a new study contends. "Our results suggest that the harm from this dreadful event over 60 years ago lives on today," said the study's leader, Matthew Neidell, in a Columbia University news release. He is an associate professor of Health Policy and Management at Colu...

  • Looks-Conscious Teens Trying Risky Supplements

    Posted: 07/05/2016

    Looks-Conscious Teens Trying Risky Supplements MONDAY, June 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many teens are turning to risky, unregulated supplements to boost their looks, warns a leading group of U.S. pediatricians. These products -- including protein powders, steroids and diet pills -- are often useless at best, toxic at worst, said the American Academy of Pediatrics in a new report. "Doctors think of performance-enhancing substance use as an athlete problem, but many non-athletes are using these substanc...

  • Long Work Hours May Hurt Your Health

    Posted: 06/29/2016

    Long Work Hours May Hurt Your Health TUESDAY, June 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Years of working long hours may help you climb the career ladder, but those hours may take a steep toll on your health -- and that's especially true for women, new research says. "People who habitually put in a lot of long hours for many years, even decades, are really running an increased risk of potentially seeing chronic disease later in life," said study researcher Allard Dembe. He's a professor of health services manage...

  • Lift Ban on CDC Research Into Gun Violence, Doctors' Group Says

    Posted: 06/22/2016

    Lift Ban on CDC Research Into Gun Violence, Doctors' Group Says TUESDAY, June 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- On the heels of yet another senseless gun massacre in the United States, the nation's leading physicians' organization is urging more research into gun violence. Specifically, the American Medical Association (AMA) said Tuesday that a long-standing ban on federal government research into gun violence must be lifted to better understand and tackle the problem. The AMA is now pledging to lobby Congre...

  • Less Heart Care, More Strokes for Women?

    Posted: 06/16/2016

    Less Heart Care, More Strokes for Women? THURSDAY, June 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women in the United States with the common heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation are more likely than men with the condition to suffer a stroke, a new study shows. Atrial fibrillation is a quivering or irregular heartbeat. This study of 1 million patients with atrial fibrillation found that women were 23 percent more likely to be hospitalized for stroke than men. "There is a debate about whether it's the biology and ...