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  • Lots of Red Meat May Be Tied to Gut Disorder in Men

    Posted: 01/15/2017

    Lots of Red Meat May Be Tied to Gut Disorder in Men TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Men who eat a lot of red meat may have a higher risk of a painful inflammatory condition of the colon, a new study suggests. The disorder, called diverticulitis, causes severe abdominal pain, nausea and constipation. And it can lead to complications such as tears or blockages in the colon. The new study found that men who ate the most red meat were 58 percent more likely to develop diverticulitis, compared to ...

  • Lower-Income Girls in U.S. Feel Unprepared for Puberty

    Posted: 01/15/2017

    Lower-Income Girls in U.S. Feel Unprepared for Puberty TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Girls from poor U.S. families feel they're missing out on vital life lessons about the female body, researchers say. Girls repeatedly said they felt ill-informed about menstruation and other changes related to puberty, according to researchers who reviewed papers published from 2000 to 2014. "Puberty is the cornerstone of reproductive development," study co-author Marni Sommer, an associate professor of soc...

  • Link Seen Between Concussions and Alzheimer's

    Posted: 01/15/2017

    Link Seen Between Concussions and Alzheimer's THURSDAY, Jan. 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Could concussions speed up the mental decline of people already at risk for Alzheimer's disease? In a new study, researchers examined 160 U.S. veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. The investigators found that concussions seem to accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain deterioration and mental decline in people who are at genetic risk for the disease. However, the study did not prove that concussions caus...

  • Lung-Sparing Surgery May Boost Mesothelioma Survival

    Posted: 01/03/2017

    Lung-Sparing Surgery May Boost Mesothelioma Survival FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Surgery that preserves the lung, when combined with other therapies, appears to extend the lives of people with a subtype of the rare and deadly cancer mesothelioma, a new study suggests. Tracking 73 patients with advanced malignant pleural mesothelioma -- which affects the lungs' protective lining in the chest cavity -- researchers found that those treated with lung-sparing surgery had an average survival of ...

  • Life After Juvenile Detention Isn't Easy, Especially for Minorities

    Posted: 12/27/2016

    Life After Juvenile Detention Isn't Easy, Especially for Minorities MONDAY, Dec. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many people have difficulty getting their lives back on track after being released from juvenile detention, especially those from racial and ethnic minorities, a new study shows. Delinquent youth are at high risk for problems in adulthood. Some of the reasons why include a background of significant trauma and loss, limited social support or adult guidance, and limited academic success, according...

  • Lab Vaccine Shields Mice Against Zika Virus

    Posted: 12/22/2016

    Lab Vaccine Shields Mice Against Zika Virus WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Antibodies drawn from a patient infected with Zika could form the basis of a vaccine against the notorious virus, a new animal study suggests. Antibodies are protective proteins produced by the immune system. In laboratory studies, two antibodies drawn from the blood of a Zika-infected patient shielded mice from Zika virus infection, according to a team of Chinese researchers. Further, these antibodies appear to avo...

  • Loneliness May Sabotage Breast Cancer Survival: Study

    Posted: 12/20/2016

    Loneliness May Sabotage Breast Cancer Survival: Study MONDAY, Dec. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Loneliness may impede long-term breast cancer survival, a new study suggests. In the years after treatment, women who don't have strong social ties are more likely to have their cancer return or die from it than women with friends and a support network, the researchers found. Reviewing data on nearly 10,000 breast cancer patients, the researchers linked isolation with a 40 percent higher risk of cancer recurr...

  • Low-Carb Diet May Aid Your Metabolism

    Posted: 12/11/2016

    Low-Carb Diet May Aid Your Metabolism FRIDAY, Dec. 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Eating low-carbohydrate meals may lead to healthy changes in a woman's metabolism that don't occur when consuming higher-carbohydrate meals, a small study suggests. The researchers also found that the timing of exercise may play a role in how beneficial it is for your metabolism. The study's senior author, Katarina Borer, said the study illustrates that small changes can make a difference, such as watching the kinds of foods ...

  • Lack of Sleep Takes Big Bite Out of World Economies

    Posted: 12/08/2016

    Lack of Sleep Takes Big Bite Out of World Economies WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Too little shut-eye can have far-reaching effects -- even financial ones, a new report says. Reduced productivity and an increased risk of death linked to lack of sleep among U.S. workers cost the nation's economy as much as $411 billion a year. That's more than 2 percent of the country's gross domestic product (GDP), the report revealed. Lack of sleep leads to the loss of about 1.2 million working days a ye...

  • Lengthy Space Missions May Harm Astronauts' Vision

    Posted: 12/06/2016

    Lengthy Space Missions May Harm Astronauts' Vision MONDAY, Nov. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have pinpointed the cause of a vision problem affecting astronauts who have completed long-duration space missions. The condition -- called visual impairment intracranial pressure (VIIP) -- has been reported by nearly two-thirds of astronauts after extended time on the International Space Station. The astronauts experienced blurred vision and were found to have structural changes, such as flattening ...