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  • Singing May Be Good Medicine for Parkinson's Patients

    Posted: 08/22/2017

    Singing May Be Good Medicine for Parkinson's Patients FRIDAY, Aug. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Singing? To benefit people with Parkinson's disease? It just may help, a researcher says. "We're not trying to make them better singers, but to help them strengthen the muscles that control swallowing and respiratory function," said Elizabeth Stegemoller, an assistant professor of kinesiology at Iowa State University. Stegemoller holds a weekly singing therapy class for Parkinson's disease patients. At each s...

  • Skeletons Give Clues to Americans' Rising Arthritis Rates

    Posted: 08/22/2017

    Skeletons Give Clues to Americans' Rising Arthritis Rates MONDAY, Aug. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Rates of knee osteoarthritis have doubled in the United States since the 1940s, but it's not just because Americans are living longer and weigh more, a new study suggests. To come to this conclusion, Harvard University researchers examined more than 2,000 skeletons from across the United States. "We were able to show, for the first time, that this pervasive cause of pain is actually twice as common today ...

  • Study Finds Options to Opioid Use After Knee Surgery

    Posted: 08/22/2017

    Study Finds Options to Opioid Use After Knee Surgery WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Alternative drug-free interventions to manage pain, including acupuncture and electrotherapy, may help reduce the need for prescription painkillers after knee replacement surgery, a new review suggests. "As prescription opioid use is under national scrutiny and because surgery has been identified as an avenue for addiction, it is important to recognize effective alternatives to standard pharmacological ther...

  • Sitting Could Be Big Health Risk for Frail Folks

    Posted: 08/22/2017

    Sitting Could Be Big Health Risk for Frail Folks MONDAY, Aug. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- After years of being told that sitting too much is deadly, a new study now suggests that being sedentary for long periods of time may not be an equal-opportunity health risk. For inactive middle-aged and older people with multiple health problems, being sedentary does appear to be linked to an increased risk of early death. But sitting a lot doesn't seem to affect active people the same way, the researchers said. ...

  • Study Supports Annual Mammograms Starting at Age 40

    Posted: 08/22/2017

    Study Supports Annual Mammograms Starting at Age 40 MONDAY, Aug. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- How frequently should women get a mammogram? Guidelines differ, but a new study estimates thousands of U.S. lives could be saved if mammograms were done every year from age 40 to 84. "Screening annually starting at age 40 is the best strategy to avert an early breast cancer death," said study co-author R. Edward Hendrick, a radiology professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. In the United Stat...

  • Steep Price Hikes Led to Drop in Use of 2 Heart Drugs at U.S. Hospitals

    Posted: 08/21/2017

    Steep Price Hikes Led to Drop in Use of 2 Heart Drugs at U.S. Hospitals WEDNESDAY, Aug. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- After steep price hikes, use of two common heart medications declined significantly in U.S. hospitals, a new study shows. The drugs, nitroprusside (Nitropress) and isoproterenol (Isuprel), have been used for decades. The findings disprove claims that price increases do not reduce patient access to and use of certain medications, the Cleveland Clinic researchers said. "In public testimony, ...

  • Stroke Rates Drop for U.S. Men, But Not Women

    Posted: 08/21/2017

    Stroke Rates Drop for U.S. Men, But Not Women WEDNESDAY, Aug. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The overall rate of strokes is declining in the United States, but appears to be going down mostly in men, a new study finds. "Our findings suggest that the decreases in rates of stroke over time are primarily driven by decreased stroke rates in men," said lead researcher Dr. Tracy Madsen. That makes doctors wonder why American women aren't seeing the same benefits from stroke prevention. "It may be that stroke pre...

  • Successful Guide Dogs Come From 'Tough Love' Moms

    Posted: 08/20/2017

    Successful Guide Dogs Come From 'Tough Love' Moms MONDAY, Aug. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Newborn puppies whose mothers let them struggle a little are more likely to succeed in guide dog training than those with doting moms, a new study suggests. "It's remarkable," said study leader Emily Bray, who recently earned a Ph.D. in psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. "It seems that puppies need to learn how to deal with small challenges at this early age and, if they don't, it hurts them later." The...

  • Some Medical Ills Call for Dental Detective Work

    Posted: 08/20/2017

    Some Medical Ills Call for Dental Detective Work TUESDAY, Aug. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Dental care isn't always as risk-free as you might think. Wire from dental braces showed up in a woman's intestines a decade after her orthodontia work ended, Australian doctors report. And in a separate case, long-term use of an adhesive for ill-fitting false teeth caused a 62-year-old in Scotland to permanently lose feeling in his legs. Both cases are described Aug. 7 in BMJ Case Reports . The otherwise healthy ...

  • Study Tests Sound Waves to Monitor Pressure Inside the Skull

    Posted: 08/20/2017

    Study Tests Sound Waves to Monitor Pressure Inside the Skull TUESDAY, Aug. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A noninvasive method of monitoring pressure inside the skull -- using sound waves -- shows promise, researchers report. Brain disease or a head injury can cause brain tissue to swell, as well as an increase in the volume of fluid that surrounds and protects the brain. This can cause pressure within the skull to rise, and serious complications and even death can result. Continuous monitoring lets doctor...