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  • Texas Reports 1st Likely Case of Local Zika Infection

    Posted: 12/04/2016

    Texas Reports 1st Likely Case of Local Zika Infection MONDAY, Nov. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Texas reported its first possible case of locally transmitted Zika infection on Monday. If confirmed, Texas would join Florida as the only states with local transmissions of the mosquito-borne illness linked to birth defects. The case involves a woman who lives in Brownsville, near Mexico, and she had no travel-related risk factors for Zika infection, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. ...

  • Tennis Anyone? It May Prolong Your Life

    Posted: 12/04/2016

    Tennis Anyone? It May Prolong Your Life TUESDAY, Nov. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- If you want to try to extend your life, a new study suggests that taking up racquet sports might help. Researchers found that people who played racquet sports -- badminton, squash, tennis -- had an almost 50 percent lower risk of dying from any cause during the 15-year study. And playing a racquet sport was linked to a 56 percent lower risk of death from heart disease during the study period. "Our findings indicate that i...

  • Testosterone Therapy May Be Linked to Serious Blood Clots

    Posted: 12/04/2016

    Testosterone Therapy May Be Linked to Serious Blood Clots WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Testosterone treatment can increase a man's risk of potentially fatal blood clots, a new study suggests. Researchers found that men taking the male hormone seem to have a 63 percent increased risk of a blood clot forming in a vein, a condition known as venous thromboembolism (VTE). These clots can cause a heart attack, stroke, organ damage or even death, according to the American Heart Association. "Ri...

  • Teen 'Choking Game' Played Solo Points to Suicide Risks

    Posted: 11/30/2016

    Teen 'Choking Game' Played Solo Points to Suicide Risks MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- About 4 percent of U.S. teens surveyed admit to trying the "choking game" -- a potentially deadly game of temporary strangulation. And new research suggests that kids who "play" the game alone are much more likely to harbor thoughts of suicide. The so-called choking game is the practice of using hands, fingers or external wrapping materials -- such as a belt, tie or noose -- to apply strong pressure against...

  • Tobacco Flavors Draw in Young Folks

    Posted: 11/30/2016

    Tobacco Flavors Draw in Young Folks TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Flavored tobacco products attract young people who also consider them less harmful, researchers say. The University of North Carolina team reviewed 40 studies conducted in the United States and other countries to assess people's attitudes about non-menthol tobacco flavors such as cherry, cotton candy and coffee. "We found that flavors for most tobacco products have a universal and rather strong appeal to youth and young adult...

  • These Medicines Often Send Americans to ERs

    Posted: 11/30/2016

    These Medicines Often Send Americans to ERs TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated one in 250 Americans lands in the hospital emergency department each year because of a medication-related reaction or problem, a new federal study finds. Among adults 65 and older, the rate is about one in 100, the study authors said. Remarkably, the medicines causing the most trouble haven't changed in a decade, the researchers noted. Blood thinners, diabetes medicines and antibiotics top the list. These...

  • Troubled Preschoolers Not Getting Effective Treatment: Report

    Posted: 11/30/2016

    Troubled Preschoolers Not Getting Effective Treatment: Report MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Most preschoolers with mood, behavior and social disorders would benefit from non-drug therapies, but few receive this type of help, a leading group of U.S. pediatricians reports. As many as one in 10 kids younger than 5 years old experiences these kinds of mental health problems, the American Academy of Pediatrics said in a new report. Current evidence supports the use of "family-focused" therapies -...

  • TV Snack Ads Make Preschoolers Snack More: Study

    Posted: 11/29/2016

    TV Snack Ads Make Preschoolers Snack More: Study MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Preschoolers who watched "Sesame Street" interrupted by TV ads for a salty snack food ended up eating more of that food soon after, a new study found. The finding suggests that "young children remain highly exposed to TV advertisements for foods that may contribute to unhealthy dietary patterns," said a team led by Jennifer Emond. She's an assistant professor of pediatrics at Dartmouth College, in Hanover, N.H. Ob...

  • Too Few U.S. Adults Have CPR Training

    Posted: 11/22/2016

    Too Few U.S. Adults Have CPR Training TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than one in five American adults has current training in CPR, and that rate is even lower among older adults, a new study finds. Immediate CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) after sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple a person's chances of survival. In cardiac arrest, a person's heart suddenly stops beating. A telephone survey of more than 9,000 adults 18 and older found that only 18 percent were currently train...

  • Tracking Blood Sugar in Pregnancy Might Lower Heart Defect Risk for Baby

    Posted: 11/21/2016

    Tracking Blood Sugar in Pregnancy Might Lower Heart Defect Risk for Baby MONDAY, Nov. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Increases in a woman's blood sugar levels during early pregnancy may affect her baby's risk of congenital heart defects, a new study suggests. Researchers led by Dr. Emmi Helle of Stanford University in California measured blood sugar levels of more than 19,000 pregnant women during their first trimester. For every 10 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) increase in blood sugar, the risk of del...