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  • Young Gay, Bisexual Men May Be at Higher Risk for Suicide, Study Finds

    Posted: 04/30/2016

    Young Gay, Bisexual Men May Be at Higher Risk for Suicide, Study Finds TUESDAY, April 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Young gay and bisexual men may be much more likely to attempt suicide or harm themselves than their older counterparts, and blacks are at greater risk than whites, British researchers report. "We know minority groups are at higher risk of poor mental health than the heterosexual majority, however the mental health differences within sexual minorities is unclear," said study author Ford Hick...

  • Your Income, Hometown May Be Key to Your Lifespan

    Posted: 04/19/2016

    Your Income, Hometown May Be Key to Your Lifespan MONDAY, April 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Where they live and how much they earn significantly affects the average American's longevity, a new study suggests. Income may even be a more important factor than geography, the researchers said. "We find very large differences across areas [of the United States] for the poor but very small differences across areas for the rich," said study lead author Raj Chetty. In other words, "where you live matters much m...

  • Young Transgender Women May Face Mental Health Woes

    Posted: 03/29/2016

    Young Transgender Women May Face Mental Health Woes MONDAY, March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More than 40 percent of young, low-income transgender women with a history of unsafe sexual behavior struggle with at least one serious mental health issue and/or substance abuse problem, a small study suggests. Nearly 20 percent have two or more serious mental health diagnoses, the investigators said. The findings concern both teens and young adults who identify as women but were born male. The study also fou...

  • Young Athletes Pressured by Parents May Resort to 'Doping'

    Posted: 03/07/2016

    Young Athletes Pressured by Parents May Resort to 'Doping' MONDAY, Feb. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Young male athletes under parental pressure to succeed are more likely to use banned substances to boost their sports performance, a new study finds. Researchers at the University of Kent in England asked 129 young male athletes, average age 17, about their attitudes on "doping" -- the use of prohibited drugs, such as steroids, hormones or stimulants, to boost athletic ability. These substances, sometime...

  • Younger Female Heart Patients More Likely to Need Follow-Up Care

    Posted: 03/02/2016

    Younger Female Heart Patients More Likely to Need Follow-Up Care TUESDAY, Feb. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women under 50 who've been treated once for heart disease seem to fare worse than similarly treated men, a new report shows. Younger women who'd already had a procedure known as angioplasty to open their heart arteries were significantly more likely to need additional procedures to keep those arteries open and functioning well than men were, the study said. Angioplasty is a procedure in which a ti...

  • Young People More Likely to Text While Driving If Friends Do: Study

    Posted: 02/22/2016

    Young People More Likely to Text While Driving If Friends Do: Study TUESDAY, Feb. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- College students whose friends text while driving are more likely to engage in this risky behavior as well, a new study suggests. Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Public Health, in College Park, questioned 861 college students about their use of instant messaging while they were driving. More than 50 percent admitted to texting while driving at least once in the past month, t...

  • Young Black, Hispanic Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Face Worse Outcomes: Study

    Posted: 02/10/2016

    Young Black, Hispanic Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Face Worse Outcomes: Study WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Hodgkin lymphoma is a form of cancer that starts in white blood cells is often curable. But, poor black and Hispanic young people are less likely to survive the disease than their white peers, a new study shows. "This study identifies vulnerable subgroups of young Hodgkin lymphoma patients at higher risk of dying from their disease, and points to disparities in treatment delivery and fo...

  • Young Adults Would Delay Seeking Stroke Treatment: Survey

    Posted: 01/18/2016

    Young Adults Would Delay Seeking Stroke Treatment: Survey MONDAY, Jan. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Immediate treatment of stroke is crucial, but a new survey finds that three-quarters of young American adults would delay going to the hospital if they had stroke symptoms. Ideally, people with an ischemic stroke (blocked blood flow to the brain) should receive medical care within three hours to give them the best chance of restoring blood flow to the brain and minimizing or reversing stroke damage, the r...

  • Yoga May Boost Quality of Life for Prostate Cancer Patients

    Posted: 11/30/2015

    Yoga May Boost Quality of Life for Prostate Cancer Patients FRIDAY, Nov. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Yoga may benefit men who are undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer, according to a small study. Many such patients experience side effects, including fatigue, erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence and a decline in their quality of life, the researchers said. The new study included 27 men who attended 75-minute yoga classes twice a week. These patients saw their quality of life and side e...

  • Your DNA May Explain High-Calorie Food Cravings

    Posted: 11/12/2015

    Your DNA May Explain High-Calorie Food Cravings THURSDAY, Nov. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Can't resist high-fat, sugary foods? Your genetic makeup may be to blame. Researchers say they've identified a pair of genetic variants that interact to boost the brain's reward responses to foods high in fat and sugar. They believe the findings might lead to new treatments for obesity. The two genetic variants are located near the FTO gene, which is associated with increased risk of obesity, and the DRD2 gene, th...