Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
New Brunswick • Somerset

RWJUH Names Brian Reilly Senior Vice President and CFO

August 17, 2012
NEW BRUNSWICK - Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital (RWJUH) has named Hainesport Township, N.J. resident Brian M. Reilly Senior Vice President of Finance and Chief Financial Officer. He assumes his new role on Sept. 4.
 
Reilly comes to RWJUH from Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia, where he served as chief financial officer for eight years.  Hahnemann University Hospital is part of the Tenet Healthcare Corporation. He also held the positions of Regional Director of Finance and Controller, Regional Manager of Financial Operations and Regional Chief Financial Officer at Tenet.
 
He earned his Master’s in Business Administration, Finance and Healthcare, in 2001 from Philadelphia University and his Bachelor of Science in Accounting from King’s College of Wilkes Barre, PA in 1993.
 
Reilly has extensive experience leading teams within the non-profit, for-profit and academic medical center settings. Reilly also has led the financial operations of affiliated physician services organizations and worked in the insurance industry to develop provider reimbursement strategies.
 
“Brian brings an outstanding track record of success and a wealth of financial management experience to our academic medical center,” says Stephen K. Jones, FACHE, President and Chief Executive Officer of Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital and Robert Wood Johnson Health System. “As we work to strengthen our already solid financial position, we know his broad knowledge and expertise will add tremendous value to our strategic growth and success.”
 
For a referral to a physician affiliated with RWJUH, please call 1-888-MD-RWJUH.
 
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About Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital

Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital (RWJUH) is a 965-bed academic medical center with campuses in New Brunswick and Somerville, NJ. Its Centers of Excellence include cardiovascular care from minimally invasive heart surgery to transplantation, cancer care, stroke care, neuroscience, joint replacement, and women’s and children’s care including The Bristol-Myers Squibb Children’s Hospital at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital (www.bmsch.org). As the flagship Cancer Hospital of Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and the principal teaching hospital of Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Brunswick, RWJUH is an innovative leader in advancing state-of-the-art care. A Level 1 Trauma Center and the only Pediatric Trauma Center in the state, RWJUH’s New Brunswick campus serves as a national resource in its ground-breaking approaches to emergency preparedness.

RWJUH has been ranked among the best hospitals in America by U.S. News & World Report seven times and has been selected by the publication as a high performing hospital in numerous specialties. The Bristol-Myers Squibb Children’s Hospital has been ranked among the best hospitals in America by U.S. News & World Report for three consecutive years.

Both the New Brunswick and Somerset campuses have earned significant national recognition for clinical quality and patient safety, including the prestigious Magnet® Award for Nursing Excellence, an “A” patient safety rating from the Leapfrog Group and “Most Wired” designation by Hospitals and Health Networks Magazine. The Joint Commission and the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services have designated the New Brunswick Campus as a Comprehensive Stroke Center and the Somerset Campus as a Primary Stroke Center.

The American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer has rated RWJUH New Brunswick among the nation’s best comprehensive cancer centers and designated the Steeplechase Cancer Center at RWJ Somerset as a Comprehensive Community Cancer Center. The Joint Surgery Center at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Somerset has earned the Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval for total knee and total hip replacement surgery.