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  • Brisk Walk May Help Sidestep Heart Disease

    Posted: 01/16/2017

    Brisk Walk May Help Sidestep Heart Disease TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Walking at moderate intensity may lower the risk of heart disease, a small study suggests. "We know walking is an excellent form of exercise, but research has been mixed on how successful a walking program can be in changing biological markers such as cholesterol, weight, blood pressure," said Pamela Stewart Fahs. She is associate dean, professor, and chair in rural nursing at the Binghamton University Decker School of...

  • Brain Deficits in Preemies May Start Before Birth

    Posted: 01/16/2017

    Brain Deficits in Preemies May Start Before Birth THURSDAY, Jan. 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Problems with brain wiring in premature babies appear to arise months before they are born, a small study suggests. The study authors said that roughly 10 percent of American babies are born preterm. The findings suggest that factors contributing to premature birth may also affect brain development, and might be associated with problems such as autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and cerebral palsy...

  • Blood Shortage Prompts Red Cross Call for Donations

    Posted: 01/16/2017

    Blood Shortage Prompts Red Cross Call for Donations FRIDAY, Jan. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Blood donations to the American Red Cross have slumped recently, so donors are desperately needed, the organization says. "Hospital patients need lifesaving blood this winter, and they're relying on the generosity of volunteer donors to provide hope in the days and weeks ahead," said Chris Hrouda, executive vice president of Red Cross Blood Services. "The Red Cross is doing everything it can to ensure blood prod...

  • Breathalyzer Lock Laws Prevent Drunk-Driving Deaths: Study

    Posted: 01/14/2017

    Breathalyzer Lock Laws Prevent Drunk-Driving Deaths: Study THURSDAY, Jan. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Breathalyzer-type devices known as ignition interlocks that prevent drunks from driving do prevent deadly accidents, a new study indicates. States started passing mandatory interlock laws in 1993. This new study found they were associated with a 7 percent decrease in the rate of fatal crashes involving at least one drunk driver. "Our study demonstrates the value of mandatory ignition interlock laws acro...

  • Bird Flu Strain May Have Jumped From Cat to Human

    Posted: 01/04/2017

    Bird Flu Strain May Have Jumped From Cat to Human FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A veterinarian appears to have been infected with a strain of avian flu known as H7N2 that spread among more than 100 cats housed at New York City animal shelters. If confirmed, this would be the first known transmission of this bird flu strain from cat to human, officials said. New York City health officials said the vet has recovered from a mild illness, and there's no sign that the flu has spread to shelter wo...

  • Blood Banks Face Seasonal Shortages, New Screening Rules

    Posted: 01/03/2017

    Blood Banks Face Seasonal Shortages, New Screening Rules FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There's typically a shortage of both blood and platelets during the holiday season. But, tighter testing for a rare complication of transfusions makes the need for platelets even more urgent, experts at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas say. Platelets are a component of blood that are essential for clotting. The complication, called transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), is the leading cause...

  • Better Sleep May Signal Recovery From Brain Injury

    Posted: 12/29/2016

    Better Sleep May Signal Recovery From Brain Injury WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Recovery from traumatic brain injury appears to go hand-in-hand with improvement of related sleep problems, a new study finds. "These results suggest that monitoring a person's sleep-wake cycle may be a useful tool for assessing their recovery after traumatic brain injury," said study author Nadia Gosselin. She's an assistant professor in the department of psychology at the University of Montreal. "We found t...

  • Baby Crib Ads Show Unsafe Practices, Study Says

    Posted: 12/27/2016

    Baby Crib Ads Show Unsafe Practices, Study Says MONDAY, Dec. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Baby crib advertisements and store displays often demonstrate unsafe sleep environments that increase an infant's risk of sudden infant death syndrome, a new study reports. About two of every five print ads show a crib setup that runs counter to safe sleep guidelines established by the American Academy of Pediatrics to protect babies against SIDS, the researchers found. The researchers also discovered half of nearl...

  • Beating Breast Cancer But Still Paying a Price

    Posted: 12/22/2016

    Beating Breast Cancer But Still Paying a Price THURSDAY, Dec. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women who survive breast cancer often experience lingering physical and emotional symptoms that go untreated, new research suggests. Ninety-two percent of long-term breast cancer survivors report at least three untreated symptoms for which they need assistance, according to the study. The most common unmet needs are achy joints, fatigue and weight gain -- each affecting about one in four survivors in the study. Su...

  • Birth Defects From Zika More Far-Reaching Than Thought

    Posted: 12/22/2016

    Birth Defects From Zika More Far-Reaching Than Thought WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Zika's ability to damage the infant brain may be even more far-reaching and insidious than previously thought, two new studies suggest. One study found that 6 percent of infants born to Zika-infected mothers in the United States had one or more birth defects related to the mosquito-borne virus. Meanwhile, a Brazilian study found 46 percent of babies of infected mothers in that country developed birth defe...