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  • Cancer Survivors Gain From Web-Based Health Care

    Posted: 02/19/2017

    Cancer Survivors Gain From Web-Based Health Care FRIDAY, Feb. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Online- and phone-based health care offers a number of benefits for cancer survivors, British researchers report. The new study looked at previous research on cancer survivors' experiences with online and phone health contacts -- what the researchers call telehealth. The review found that patients liked the flexibility and convenience of this method of staying in touch with their care providers because they could ...

  • Cutting Salt a Health Boost for Kidney Patients

    Posted: 02/19/2017

    Cutting Salt a Health Boost for Kidney Patients THURSDAY, Feb. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Encouraging people with kidney disease to reduce their salt intake may help improve blood pressure and cut excess fluid retention, at least for a while, a new study suggests. Study participants lowered their systolic blood pressure (the top number) by almost 11 points, on average, on a salt-restricted diet versus their usual diet. They also flushed out a liter of water (about one-quart) from their bodies, on aver...

  • Chronic Pain More Likely for Poor, Less Educated: Study

    Posted: 02/19/2017

    Chronic Pain More Likely for Poor, Less Educated: Study FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic pain is much more common among poor, less educated older Americans than their wealthier, more educated peers, a new study suggests. "I found that people with lower levels of education and wealth don't just have more pain, they also have more severe pain," said study author Hanna Grol-Prokopczyk. She's an assistant professor of sociology from the University at Buffalo in Buffalo, N.Y. "I also looked ...

  • College Students Seem to Take Longer to Recover From Concussion

    Posted: 02/16/2017

    College Students Seem to Take Longer to Recover From Concussion THURSDAY, Feb. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- College students seem to take longer to recover from concussion than the average in the United States, a new study suggests. Researchers reviewed the medical charts of 128 students who suffered a concussion during the 2014-2015 academic year at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. Their average age was 20. Forty-four students were varsity athletes and 33 played club sports. Another 34 played r...

  • Calcium Buildup in Young Arteries May Signal Heart Attack Risk

    Posted: 02/16/2017

    Calcium Buildup in Young Arteries May Signal Heart Attack Risk WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults with any amount of calcified plaque in their arteries are already at risk of a heart attack, a new study finds. Among those 32 to 46 years old, even a little calcified plaque -- called atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries -- can boost the odds for fatal or nonfatal heart disease fivefold over the next 12 years, researchers found. "Heart disease really begins in adolescence and...

  • Could Night Shifts, Heavy Lifting Impair a Woman's Fertility?

    Posted: 02/15/2017

    Could Night Shifts, Heavy Lifting Impair a Woman's Fertility? TUESDAY, Feb. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Women who work night shifts or do heavy physical labor may be somewhat less fertile than other women, new research suggests. In a study of women undergoing fertility treatment, researchers found that those who worked at night or did heavy lifting on the job tended to have fewer "mature" eggs. In theory, that could lower their chances of having a baby. However, experts stressed that the findings have t...

  • Certain Bacteria May Affect Preterm Birth Risk

    Posted: 02/13/2017

    Certain Bacteria May Affect Preterm Birth Risk FRIDAY, Feb. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Certain types of bacteria in a pregnant woman's cervix and vagina can affect her risk of preterm birth, a new study finds. The discovery could lead to new ways to prevent preterm birth (before 37 weeks of pregnancy) either by getting rid of bad bacteria or boosting protective bacteria, according to the researchers. For the study, the investigators analyzed vaginal swabs from 2,000 expectant mothers at three different...

  • Common Painkillers Don't Ease Back Pain, Study Finds

    Posted: 02/10/2017

    Common Painkillers Don't Ease Back Pain, Study Finds THURSDAY, Feb. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Painkillers like aspirin, Aleve and Advil don't help most people with back pain, a new review finds. The researchers estimated that only one in six people gained a benefit from taking these nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Meanwhile, previous research has suggested that another common painkiller, Tylenol (acetaminophen), isn't very useful either, the study authors added. The findings raise the p...

  • Can Air Pollution Heighten Alzheimer's Risk?

    Posted: 02/09/2017

    Can Air Pollution Heighten Alzheimer's Risk? WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Air pollution may cause more than just lung disease: New research suggests that if tiny particles in the air from power plants and cars are inhaled, they might also invade the brain, increasing the risk for dementia. "Although the link between air pollution and Alzheimer's disease is a new scientific frontier, we now have evidence that air pollution, like tobacco, is dangerous to the aging brain," said study co-seni...

  • Can Pregnancy Harm Your Heart?

    Posted: 02/09/2017

    Can Pregnancy Harm Your Heart? THURSDAY, Feb. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancy might affect a woman's risk of future heart problems, two new studies suggest. A woman's risk of atrial fibrillation -- an abnormal heart rhythm -- rises with each pregnancy, up to a nearly 50 percent increased risk with six or more pregnancies, according to the results from one study. "There's something about pregnancy itself that predisposes women toward this risk," said lead author Dr. Jorge Wong. He's a cardiologist ...