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  • Increasing Salt Intake Tied to Diabetes Risk

    Posted: 09/24/2017

    Increasing Salt Intake Tied to Diabetes Risk THURSDAY, Sept. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of salt consumption may increase an adult's risk of developing diabetes, researchers say. The new study included data from a few thousand people in Sweden. The findings showed that salt intake was associated with an average 65 percent increase in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes for each 2.5 extra grams of salt (slightly less than half a teaspoon) consumed per day. People with the highest salt int...

  • It's a Food Allergy! Where's the School Nurse?

    Posted: 09/24/2017

    It's a Food Allergy! Where's the School Nurse? MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many students who suffer a severe allergic reaction at school get potentially lifesaving epinephrine injections from unlicensed staff or other students, not a school nurse, a new study finds. "The findings highlight the importance of having a supply of epinephrine available in schools, and people trained to administer it during an allergy emergency," said study author Dr. Michael Pistiner. He is director of food al...

  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease May Raise Cancer Risk in Kids

    Posted: 09/24/2017

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease May Raise Cancer Risk in Kids THURSDAY, Sept. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) face an increased risk of cancer, a new study claims. The risk persists into adulthood, and is especially elevated for gastrointestinal cancers, the researchers added. The "extent and duration of chronic inflammation might be the main driving mechanisms underlying the increased risk of cancer," the researchers suggested. The international team, led by Dr. O...

  • Immune-Focused Drug May Be New Weapon Against Advanced Melanoma

    Posted: 09/21/2017

    Immune-Focused Drug May Be New Weapon Against Advanced Melanoma MONDAY, Sept. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that Opdivo -- a drug that works with the immune system to fight melanoma -- is more effective than the current standard of care for patients who've had surgery to remove advanced tumors. The international study was funded by Opdivo's maker, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and included more than 900 patients with stage III and stage IV melanoma. Patients were treated at 130 medical cent...

  • Is an Occasional Drink OK During Pregnancy?

    Posted: 09/21/2017

    Is an Occasional Drink OK During Pregnancy? TUESDAY, Sept. 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- During the nine months of pregnancy, many pregnant women have wondered -- would one or two glasses of wine really put my baby at risk? And, unfortunately, researchers still don't know for sure. But a new review of several existing studies hints that small amounts of alcohol may slightly boost the risk of premature birth and low birth weight. The researchers acknowledge that the studies so far have been sparse and, in...

  • Is Dementia Declining Among Older Americans?

    Posted: 09/14/2017

    Is Dementia Declining Among Older Americans? TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Here's some good news for America's seniors: The rates of Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia have dropped significantly over the last decade or so, a new study shows. The analysis of nearly 1,400 men and women 70 and older found that the number of dementia cases dropped from 73 among those born before 1920 to just 3 among those born after 1929. The reasons for the decline aren't clear, researchers said. But one ...

  • Injury Risk Spikes While Cancer Patients Seek Diagnosis: Study

    Posted: 09/10/2016

    Injury Risk Spikes While Cancer Patients Seek Diagnosis: Study THURSDAY, Sept. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer patients face an added risk of injuries while their condition is being diagnosed, a new study says. The findings show the need for more effort to prevent both accidental and other types of injuries while patients await a diagnosis, according to the researchers. Led by Qing Shen, a postgraduate student in the department of medical epidemiology and biostatistics at Karolinska Institute in Stoc...

  • In Mice, a Way for Stem Cells to Build Bone

    Posted: 09/08/2016

    In Mice, a Way for Stem Cells to Build Bone WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they've found an easy way to spur stem cells to build bone in mice -- a discovery that could lead to new treatments for bone disease. The team of scientists from the University of California, San Diego used a naturally occurring molecule called adenosine to prompt human stem cells to regenerate bone tissue. The new tissue helped repair cranial bone defects in the mice. Stem cells can become any type ...

  • iPads Calm Surgery-Bound Kids as Well as Sedatives

    Posted: 09/07/2016

    iPads Calm Surgery-Bound Kids as Well as Sedatives TUESDAY, Aug. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Savvy parents probably already suspect it: iPads work as well as sedative drugs to calm anxious kids before surgery, a new study shows. Researchers assessed 112 children between 4 and 10 years old in France who had day surgery requiring general anesthesia. Twenty minutes before receiving the anesthesia, 54 kids were given the sedative midazolam and 58 were handed an iPad to distract them. Anxiety levels in both...

  • Is Compromise More Likely When Women Are Part of the Decision?

    Posted: 08/27/2016

    Is Compromise More Likely When Women Are Part of the Decision? FRIDAY, Aug. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When women are part of a decision-making team, compromise is likely. If it's all up to men, on the other hand, the "extreme" option will often win. That's according to a new study that tested people's buying decisions, when alone or paired up with another person. In general, the researchers found, when a man was teamed with another man, they typically went for the extreme choice -- the "biggest, heav...