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  • Pesticide Exposures May Alter Mouth Bacteria

    Posted: 12/04/2016

    Pesticide Exposures May Alter Mouth Bacteria MONDAY, Nov. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pesticide exposure may change the makeup of bacteria in the mouths of farm workers, a new study finds. Researchers at the University of Washington analyzed swabs taken from the mouths of 65 adult farm workers and 52 adults who didn't work on farms. All lived in Washington's Yakima Valley. The farm workers had higher blood levels of pesticides, and greater changes in their mouth bacteria than non-farm workers, the stud...

  • Pediatricians Can Help When Parents Divorce: Report

    Posted: 12/04/2016

    Pediatricians Can Help When Parents Divorce: Report MONDAY, Nov. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A pediatrician can play an important part in helping children adjust when their parents split up, a new American Academy of Pediatrics report says. "The pediatrician can help parents understand their children's reactions to divorce or separation," said report co-lead author Dr. Carol Weitzman, chairwoman of the AAP's Section on Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. "Those reactions will vary, depending on ag...

  • Pradaxa Blood Thinner May Beat Warfarin After Bleeding Episode: Study

    Posted: 12/04/2016

    Pradaxa Blood Thinner May Beat Warfarin After Bleeding Episode: Study THURSDAY, Dec. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a blood thinner is routine for many heart patients, but these drugs come with a risk of episodes of excess bleeding. What, if any, anticoagulant (blood thinner) should these patients take after such episodes arise? A new study suggests that the blood thinner Pradaxa (dabigatran) may be a better choice than the standby drug warfarin in these cases. The reason: Pradaxa is less likely tha...

  • Plastic Surgeons Urge Giving Up E-Cigs Before Procedure

    Posted: 12/04/2016

    Plastic Surgeons Urge Giving Up E-Cigs Before Procedure FRIDAY, Dec. 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Plastic surgery patients should avoid smoking e-cigarettes for at least four weeks before their procedures, two plastic surgeons advise. Patients who smoke are believed to face a higher risk of skin flap failure, apparently because nicotine reduces blood flow, the surgeons said. "Based on our current best knowledge, it seems reasonable to advise plastic surgery candidates to cease e-cigarette use," said Dr. ...

  • Palliative Care Raises Quality of Life, But Doesn't Extend It

    Posted: 11/30/2016

    Palliative Care Raises Quality of Life, But Doesn't Extend It TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Palliative care can ease the burden that a serious illness places on both a patient and loved ones, but there's no evidence that it can extend the life of a sick person, a review of the available evidence has concluded. People who receive palliative care have better quality of life and fewer symptoms than people who don't receive such care, said study lead author Dio Kavalieratos. He is an assistant ...

  • Poor Sleep Linked to Worsening Kidney Disease

    Posted: 11/29/2016

    Poor Sleep Linked to Worsening Kidney Disease SATURDAY, Nov. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For people with chronic kidney disease, poor sleep may boost the chances that their illness will worsen, new research suggests. "Short sleep and fragmented sleep are significant yet unappreciated risk factors for chronic kidney disease progression," said study author Dr. Ana Ricardo, of the University of Illinois at Chicago. "Our research adds to the accumulating knowledge regarding the importance of sleep on kidne...

  • Partial Repeal of Motorcycle Helmet Law Had Unwanted Effects: Study

    Posted: 11/28/2016

    Partial Repeal of Motorcycle Helmet Law Had Unwanted Effects: Study FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Motorcycle helmet use fell and more riders suffered head injuries after Michigan repealed part of its universal helmet law in 2012, a new study finds. The repeal allowed motorcyclists 21 and older to ride without a helmet in Michigan if they had a valid motorcycle license and a $20,000 "vehicle insurance supplement," the study said. In the 12 months after the repeal, helmet use was 24 percent lo...

  • Pessimism May Take Unwelcome Toll on the Heart

    Posted: 11/27/2016

    Pessimism May Take Unwelcome Toll on the Heart THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Always seeing the cup as half empty, rather than half full, may increase the likelihood of dying from heart disease, Finnish researchers say. An 11-year study of nearly 3,000 men and women found that those who were the most pessimistic were two times more likely to die of heart disease than those who were the least pessimistic. And, while pessimism was linked to an increased risk of heart-related death, optimism d...

  • Public Health Campaign Cut Consumption of Sugary Drinks

    Posted: 11/27/2016

    Public Health Campaign Cut Consumption of Sugary Drinks THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A public health campaign to reduce sugary drink consumption led to a significant drop in sales of the beverages in a Maryland county, a new report says. Sodas and other drinks with added sugars are a leading source of empty calories among Americans, and high sugar intake is associated with obesity and increased risk of heart disease. In 2012, the Horizon Foundation and several community partners launched ...

  • Poor Sense of Smell May Signal Alzheimer's Risk

    Posted: 11/24/2016

    Poor Sense of Smell May Signal Alzheimer's Risk WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A person's sense of smell may help predict their risk for Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests. The researchers included 183 older people, and 10 had possible or probable Alzheimer's disease, the researchers said. Study volunteers were tested on their ability to recognize, remember and distinguish between odors. These odors included menthol, clove, leather, strawberry, lilac, pineapple, smoke, soap, grape o...