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  • Radiologists Don't Face Higher Risk of Radiation-Related Death: Study

    Posted: 07/26/2016

    Radiologists Don't Face Higher Risk of Radiation-Related Death: Study TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Radiologists who graduated from medical school after 1940 are not at greater risk of death from chronic exposure to low levels of radiation, a new study reports. The researchers, from the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI), credited improvements in radiation protection, safety equipment and monitoring. Led by Amy Berrington de Gonzalez, chief of the NCI's Radiation Epidemiology Branch, the ...

  • Research Sees Potential to Make Bone, Muscle From Human Stem Cells

    Posted: 07/21/2016

    Research Sees Potential to Make Bone, Muscle From Human Stem Cells THURSDAY, July 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists say they've mapped the biological and chemical signals needed to make bone, heart muscle and 10 other cells types from human stem cells within a matter of days. The researchers from Stanford University School of Medicine say the ability to quickly coax human embryonic (pluripotent) stem cells to generate such cell types as skeletal muscle, bone and blood vessels would be a major adva...

  • Road Rage Rampant in America

    Posted: 07/21/2016

    Road Rage Rampant in America THURSDAY, July 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Next time you're ready to make a rude gesture when another driver cuts you off in traffic, take a deep breath. America's highways are already more than mean enough, according to a new study from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. Nearly 8 of 10 drivers demonstrated significant anger, aggression or road rage in the past year, the study found. They admitted to tailgating, confronting other motorists and even hitting other cars on...

  • Rising Blood Sugar Hitting More Obese Adults

    Posted: 07/21/2016

    Rising Blood Sugar Hitting More Obese Adults WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Among obese American adults, control of blood sugar is worsening, leading to more diabetes and heart disease, a new study finds. While blood pressure and cholesterol levels stayed relatively stable among obese adults, poor control of blood sugar led to a 37 percent increase in heart disease risk factors between 1988 and 2014, the researchers reported. "Obese adults with cardiovascular disease risk factors may need ...

  • Routine Eye Exams See Vision Problems You Miss

    Posted: 07/20/2016

    Routine Eye Exams See Vision Problems You Miss WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Routine eye checkups often pick up unnoticed problems, particularly in older adults, a new study says. "In asymptomatic patients, comprehensive routine optometric eye examinations detect a significant number of new eye conditions and/or results in management changes," said the study's author, Elizabeth Irving, and her colleagues from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. More than half of people with no ...

  • Researchers Get Closer to Test Predicting Colon Cancer's Return

    Posted: 07/17/2016

    Researchers Get Closer to Test Predicting Colon Cancer's Return THURSDAY, July 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A blood test that detects bits of DNA shed from colon cancers may someday help doctors predict a relapse, researchers report. This "liquid biopsy" predicted -- with imperfect accuracy -- the return of colon cancer in patients with early forms of the disease, the team said. "Although this and other DNA-based blood tests are not perfect, this study shows that when we find tumor DNA circulating in the...

  • Repaired ACL More Likely to Tear Again in Young Women

    Posted: 07/15/2016

    Repaired ACL More Likely to Tear Again in Young Women THURSDAY, July 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Female athletes younger than 25 have the highest risk for a repeat tear of the knee's anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) after surgery to repair it, a new study says. The study included just over 500 male and female athletes who underwent ACL reconstruction with a hamstring graft and were followed for two years. Their average age was 27. They were allowed to return to sports six to 12 months after surgery if t...

  • Regular Doctor Visits Can Help Spot Colon Cancer

    Posted: 07/12/2016

    Regular Doctor Visits Can Help Spot Colon Cancer MONDAY, July 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Making regular visits to a primary care doctor increases the odds you'll be screened for colon cancer, a new study says. Colon cancer is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. But colon cancer screening is underused, the study authors said. "These findings help underscore the continued importance and effectiveness of visits with primary care physicians in a b...

  • Reassessing the Annual Pelvic Exam

    Posted: 07/07/2016

    Reassessing the Annual Pelvic Exam WEDNESDAY, June 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women, the U.S. medical establishment isn't doing away with annual pelvic exams -- at least just yet. But a panel of U.S. medical experts has concluded there's no proof the dreaded checkup benefits healthy women who aren't pregnant. In a draft recommendation released Tuesday, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said it couldn't weigh in for or against routine pelvic exams based on current evidence. "The Task Force is cal...

  • Religion a Buffer Against Suicide for Women, Study Suggests

    Posted: 07/07/2016

    Religion a Buffer Against Suicide for Women, Study Suggests WEDNESDAY, June 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women who regularly attend religious services may have a lower risk of suicide than those who don't, a new study suggests. U.S. researchers reviewed data on nearly 90,000 women. They were enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study from 1996 to 2010. During that time, there were 36 suicides. About 19 percent of women in the study attended religious services more than once a week. Around 41 percent attended ...