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For the Caregiver

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For the Caregiver

Long-Term Care Planning Quiz
How Much Do You Know About Planning for Long-Term Care? People who need long-term care include those with a chronic illness or a physical handicap. Learn more about long-term care planning by taking this quiz, based on information from the National Institute on Aging (NIA). 1. Which expert is trained to help you and your family develop a plan for long-term care? You didn't answer this question. You answered The correct answer is This is a special kind of social worker or nurse. A geriatric case manager,...
Fast Facts
Middle-aged women are often the caregivers for their aging parents.
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
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Health Newcomer: The Patient Advocate
Health Newcomer: The Patient Advocate The average health care provider visit lasts less than 15 minutes, so if you've got lots of questions about your illness or medical bills or insurance claims, what do you do? Until now, your choice has been to ask a nurse, social worker, or the staff at your health insurance company. Over the past decade, however, a go-to person known as a patient advocate has appeared on the health care list. This person can provide answers, education, support, and care to patients...
Planning the Care of Your Aging Parents
Planning the Care of Your Aging Parents If your parents are in their golden years, keep in mind that even gold can lose some of its glow with the expected effects of old age. Sooner or later, older loved ones will need assistance. Advance planning Make sure legal documents have been drawn up. This includes an up-to-date will, a durable power of attorney, a living will, and a health-care proxy. Research the housing options and services available in your parents' community. Discuss with your loved ones ho...
Understanding Long-Term Care
Understanding Long-Term Care When people of any age need others to help them with medical, physical, or emotional needs over an extended period of time, they need long-term care. If a person needs ongoing medical care or is unable to perform everyday self-care activities like bathing, dressing, or grocery shopping, long-term care may be needed. Experts estimate that approximately 10 million Americans need long-term care in any given year. Long-term-care services may be given in the home of the person wh...
In Support Groups, You Get (and Give) Help
In Support Groups, You Get (and Give) Help What if you were diagnosed with cancer? What if your spouse died and you suddenly found yourself a single parent? What if you were living with an alcoholic and didn't know how to cope? Any of these situations—and a host of others—would leave you feeling alone and in need of an ally. You could find help in a mutual support group. Sure, you've got family and friends, but do they really understand what you're up against? Your doctor, social worker, or counselor ma...
Caring for the Caregiver
Caring for the Caregiver Caregivers come in all shapes and sizes. They can be adult children, spouses, siblings, friends or neighbors, who help with daily activities such as bathing, feeding and clothing. The caregiver may be the only person who can take a loved one to doctors' appointments. The long-distance caregiver may call weekly, help with expenses or support the main caregiver. According to the National Family Caregivers Association (NFCA), more than 65 million people provide a level of care to a...