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Cholesterol

Understanding Cholesterol

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Understanding Cholesterol

Heart Disease Prevention Quiz
What Do You Know About Preventing Heart Disease? You can take steps to reduce your risk for heart disease. Find out more about preventing heart disease by taking this quiz. 1. Which of these is a cause of heart disease? You didn't answer this question. You answered The correct answer is This condition is called atherosclerosis. Fat and cholesterol build up in the arteries and create places of inflammation. This buildup is called plaque. The plaque makes the inside of the arteries narrower and stiffer, a...
Fast Facts
Too much cholesterol in your blood can put you at risk for heart disease and stroke.
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What is Cholesterol?

The Truth About Triglycerides
The Truth About Triglycerides You’ve probably had your blood tested for cholesterol by your health care provider. This lipid, or fat, test measures your total cholesterol, HDL (“good”) cholesterol and LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. It also measures your triglycerides, which can tell your provider a lot about your health. Triglycerides are the most common type of fat in your body. Most of your body's fat is stored as triglycerides. Cholesterol and fat Cholesterol and other fats in your blood are needed for cer...
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Why Control Cholesterol

Atherosclerosis
Atherosclerosis What is atherosclerosis? Atherosclerosis thickening or hardening of the arteries. It is caused by a buildup of plaque in the inner lining of an artery. Click to expand Plaque is made up of deposits of fatty substances, cholesterol, cellular waste products, calcium, and fibrin. As it builds up in the arteries, the artery walls become thickened and stiff. Atherosclerosis is a slow, progressive disease that may start as early as childhood. However, it can progress rapidly. What causes ather...
Coronary Heart Disease
Coronary Heart Disease What are the coronary arteries? Coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle. Like all other tissues in the body, the heart muscle needs oxygen-rich blood to function, and oxygen-depleted blood must be carried away. The coronary arteries run along the outside of the heart and have small branches that supply blood to the heart muscle. What are the different coronary arteries? Click image to enlarge The 2 main coronary arteries are the left main and right coronary arteries. Le...
Coronary Heart Disease
Coronary Heart Disease What are the coronary arteries? Coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle. Like all other tissues in the body, the heart muscle needs oxygen-rich blood to function, and oxygen-depleted blood must be carried away. The coronary arteries run along the outside of the heart and have small branches that supply blood to the heart muscle. What are the different coronary arteries? Click image to enlarge The 2 main coronary arteries are the left main and right coronary arteries. Le...
Lower Your Cholesterol
Lower Your Cholesterol There's a lot of information about cholesterol in the news, and with good reason. High cholesterol contributes to heart disease. Heart disease kills more Americans than all cancers combined. What is cholesterol? Cholesterol is a waxy, fatlike substance that your body—mostly the liver—makes. Cholesterol is used to make some hormones, vitamin D, and bile acids. These help to digest fat. Cholesterol also is used to build healthy cell membranes (walls) in the brain, nerves, muscles, s...
Helping to Prevent a Second Heart Attack
Helping to Prevent a Second Heart Attack Most Americans survive a first heart attack but are at increased risk for another one. By taking action, however, they can significantly reduce their chances for a second heart attack. Risk factors These factors increase your risk for another heart attack, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP): Sedentary lifestyle Being overweight or obese High cholesterol High blood sugar if you have diabetes High blood pressure Smoking Excess stress The ...
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Strategies for Managing Cholesterol

Heart Disease Worksheet
Heart Disease Worksheet It's important to get regular checkups and periodic exams, especially when you have cardiovascular disease. Provide the information requested below to find out how well you're managing your condition. Lipid profile I had a lipid profile on __________. A lipid profile is a lab test that measures the amount of certain fats and cholesterol in your blood. High lipid levels can lead to a heart attack or cause your heart disease to worsen. You should have a lipid profile at least once ...
Cut Your Cholesterol, Without Drugs
Cut Your Cholesterol, Without Drugs Regarding the troublesome fat your body makes called cholesterol: Chances are good that you may not need drugs to keep it in check. True, people with a strong genetic predisposition to high cholesterol often need medication to control cholesterol. But a lot of people don't. For most people, lifestyle changes are the key to maintaining a healthy balance between bad cholesterol, which clogs the arteries, and good cholesterol, which combats the clogging process. High cho...
All About Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs
All About Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs Making healthy lifestyle changes alone is enough to help some people reach the cholesterol goals prescribed by their doctor. Others, however, need to take a cholesterol-lowering medication, as well. According to the American Heart Association, there are five main types: Statins (atorvastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, simvastatin, pitavastatin). These drugs work mainly by lowering LDL ("bad") cholesterol. They typically reduce LDL by 30 to 4...
Anger Can Raise Cholesterol Levels
Anger Can Raise Cholesterol Levels When someone cuts you off on a busy highway, do you pound the steering wheel in fury and shout at the driver? Or do you swallow your anger and dwell on it later? Either way, you're not being kind to your heart, researchers say. If you respond to every anger-inducing situation by blowing your stack or by holding it in, you could be setting yourself up for serious heart problems. Why? It's simple. According to Ohio State University researchers, there's evidence that peop...