Chemical Peel

Healthy Woman - Chemical Peel

Considerations Before Having a Chemical Peel

It is very important to find a physician who has adequate training and experience in skin resurfacing.

In some states, a medical degree is not required to perform a chemical peel - even the strongest phenol peels - and many states have laws that permit non-physicians to administer certain peel solutions, but regulate the strengths which they are permitted to apply.

What is a chemical peel?

Chemical peeling uses a chemical solution in order to improve the skin's appearance. It can reduce or eliminate fine lines under the eyes and around the mouth, correct uneven skin pigmentation, remove pre-cancerous skin growths, and soften acne or treat the scars caused by acne. The procedure can also treat wrinkles caused by sun damage and scarring, as well as skin blemishes common with age and heredity. Chemical peels can be performed on the face, neck, chest, hands, arms, and legs.

Possible complications associated with chemical peels:

Possible complications associated with chemical peels may include, but are not limited to, the following:

A chemical peel is most commonly performed for cosmetic reasons, to enhance appearance and self-confidence, and may be performed in conjunction with a facelift. However, a chemical peel is not a substitute for a facelift, and does not prevent or slow the aging process.

What substances are used for chemical peels?

Phenol, trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and alphahydroxy acids (AHAs) are used for chemical peels. The precise formula used may be adjusted for each specific patient.

About the procedure:

The procedure involves a chemical solution that is applied to the skin. The solution causes a layer of skin to separate and peel off. The new, regenerated skin underneath is usually smoother, less wrinkled, and more even in color than the old skin.

Click here to view the
Online Resources of Women's Center

 

Top of Page return to top of page